Macron: My charm offensive may soften Trump's climate stance




Macron: My charm offensive may soften Trump
Macron: My charm offensive may soften Trump's climate stance

PARIS (AP) -- French President Emmanuel Macron says his glamorous Paris charm offensive on Donald Trump was carefully calculated - and may have changed the U.S. president's mind about climate change.

Macron defended his outreach to Trump, whose "America first" policies have elicited worry and disdain in Europe.

"Our countries are friends, so we should be too," Macron said in an interview Sunday in the Journal du dimanche newspaper.

After a tense, white-knuckle handshake at their first meeting in May, Macron said they gained "better, intimate knowledge of each other" during Trump's visit to Paris last week.

On their main point of contention - Trump's withdrawal from the landmark Paris climate agreement - Macron is quoted as saying that "Donald Trump listened to me. He understood the reason for my position, notably the link between climate change and terrorism."

Increasing droughts and other extreme weather blamed on man-made climate change are worsening migration crises and conflicts in some regions as populations fight over dwindling resources.

"He said he would try to find a solution in the coming months. We spoke in detail about what could allow him to return to the Paris deal," Macron said, according to the newspaper.

While in Paris, Trump remained non-committal about the U.S. eventually rejoining the climate agreement, telling Macron, "if it happens that will be wonderful, and if it doesn't that will be OK too." Trump has said the climate deal was unfair to U.S. business.

The French leader acknowledged that Trump's Paris visit - including a formal welcome at Napoleon's tomb, dinner in the Eiffel Tower and a place of honor at the annual Bastille Day military parade - was choreographed to give Americans a "stronger image of France" after deadly Islamic extremist attacks damaged the country's vital tourism sector.

It was also aimed at Trump himself, who has said that Paris has been ruined by the threat of terrorism, which he ties to immigrants.

"I think Donald Trump left having a better image of France than upon his arrival," Macron is quoted as saying.

COMMENTS

More Related News

'We're embarrassed too': How John Kelly reacted to Donald Trump's threats against North Korea
'We're embarrassed too': How John Kelly reacted to Donald Trump's threats against North Korea

John Kelly, Donald Trump's chief-of-staff, appeared to go through an "existential crisis" on Tuesday, social media users joked, as he listened to the president's address to the UN General Assembly. Mr Trump used his maiden address to the world's leaders to escalate his standoff with North Korea over its nuclear challenge, threatening to "totally destroy" the country of 26 million people and mocking its leader, Kim Jong-un, as a "rocket man." A great and important day at the United Nations.Met with leaders of many nations who agree with much (or all) of what I stated in my speech!- Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 20, 2017 It was...

Trump takes 'America First' to wary U.N. audience
Trump takes 'America First' to wary U.N. audience

President Trump will use his maiden speech to the U.N. General Assembly to condemn Iran, call for global action on North Korea, and unapologetically defend his nationalistic "America First" stance before wary world leaders, administration officials said. Chinese President Xi Jinping is skipping the annual diplomatic crush in New York, but Trump will at least implicitly criticize Beijing in his Tuesday speech for not doing enough to tighten an economic vise on North Korea.

Interior chief urges shrinking 4 national monuments in West
Interior chief urges shrinking 4 national monuments in West

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is recommending that four large national monuments in the West be reduced in size, potentially opening up hundreds of thousands of acres of land revered for natural beauty ...

Hillary Clinton Won't Rule Out Questioning The Legitimacy Of Donald Trump's Election
Hillary Clinton Won't Rule Out Questioning The Legitimacy Of Donald Trump's Election

Hillary Clinton opened the door to possibly questioning whether Donald Trump was legitimately elected president, depending on the outcome of investigations into Russia's role in the 2016 campaign.

Trump
Trump's week anchored by speech to UN General Assembly

NEW YORK (AP) - President Donald Trump is making his debut at the United Nations and taking his complaints about the world body straight to the source.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Economy

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.