Milwaukee County sheriff not joining DHS, after all




MILWAUKEE (AP) - The Department of Homeland Security says Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke is no longer a candidate for a position in the agency.

The conservative firebrand said last month he was taking a job as an assistant secretary at the DHS, but the agency declined to confirm the appointment, saying it announces such senior appointments once the DHS secretary makes them official.

Craig Peterson, a political adviser to Clarke, said in a statement that the sheriff notified DHS Secretary John Kelly late Friday that he "had rescinded his acceptance of the agency's offer" to join the department. The Washington Post first reported on Clarke's decision.

The tough-talking Clarke, who is known for his provocative social media presence, is an outspoken supporter of President Donald Trump. According to Peterson's statement, Clarke said he "is 100 percent committed" to Trump's success and that he "believes his skills could be better utilized to promote the President's agenda in a more aggressive role."

Clarke is "reviewing options inside and outside of government," the statement said.

A DHS spokesman said by email Sunday that Clarke is no longer being considered for a position within DHS.

Clarke has drawn a considerable amount of controversy as Milwaukee County sheriff.

He was hit by allegations last month that he plagiarized content in his master's thesis on homeland security, which he denied.

Seven workers at the county jail he oversees are at the center of a criminal investigation into the dehydration death last year of an inmate who prosecutors say was deprived of water as punishment. Clarke isn't among the seven staffers - prosecutors said he wasn't directly involved in the events that led to the death of 38-year-old Terrill Thomas - but the death happened under Clarke's leadership, which his critics say is enough cause for his firing.

COMMENTS

More Related News

Dennis Rodman Defends North Korea, Takes Credit for Otto Warmbier
Dennis Rodman Defends North Korea, Takes Credit for Otto Warmbier's Release

Rodman said he didn't meet with North Korea's leader, Kim Jong-Un, during his most recent visit, but considered him a friend and has spent time with him in the past. Meanwhile, Rodman and his agent feel they are partially responsible for the North Korea's release of American college student Otto Warmbier

Trump lawyers make final Supreme Court pitch on travel ban
Trump lawyers make final Supreme Court pitch on travel ban
  • US
  • 2017-06-21 16:49:25Z

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration on Wednesday made its final plea to the U.S. Supreme Court to allow its proposed ban on travelers from six Muslim-majority countries to go into effect as the justices weigh how to handle the hotly contested dispute. The court papers filed by President Donald Trump's administration complete the briefing on the government's emergency application asking the justices to block lower court injunctions in favor of challengers to the ban. In the court papers, Acting Solicitor General Jeff Wall said the lower courts had wrongly second-guessed the president on national security policy when reviewing the March 6 executive order.

Russian hackers targeted 21 U.S. states during election: U.S. official
Russian hackers targeted 21 U.S. states during election: U.S. official

By Dustin Volz WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Russian hackers targeted 21 U.S. states' election systems in last year's presidential race, a Department of Homeland Security official told Congress on Wednesday. Jeanette Manfra, the department's acting deputy undersecretary of cyber security, would not identify which states had been targeted, citing confidentiality agreements. "As of right now, we have evidence that election-related systems in 21 states were targeted," Manfra told the Senate Intelligence Committee, which investigating Russia's meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

Former homeland secretary says FBI delayed notification of cyber hack
Former homeland secretary says FBI delayed notification of cyber hack
  • US
  • 2017-06-21 14:35:01Z

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson told a congressional panel on Wednesday that there was a delay between the time the FBI first made contact with the Democratic National Committee about Russia hacking its servers and the time he was notified at the Department of Homeland Security. Johnson, who served under President Barack Obama, was testifying about alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. (Reporting by Julia Edwards Ainsley)

Bill Imposing Sanctions On Russia Hits Roadblock
Bill Imposing Sanctions On Russia Hits Roadblock

Members of the House found a constitutional issue that could possibly delay the bill and help the Trump administration make changes to the legislation.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.