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Broad Institute wins gene-editing patent case
Broad Institute wins gene-editing patent case

What many have described as the biotechnology trial of the century came to a close Wednesday, with the Broad Institute winning the patent to a popular gene-editing process known as CRISPR/Cas-9. The legal battle over who really invented the technology pitted Feng Zhang of the Broad Institute -- a research facility affiliated with Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology -- against French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier of the Max Planck Institute in Berlin and biochemist Jennifer Doudna of the University of California, Berkeley. Charpentier and Doudna have won multiple prizes in the past four years and were widely considered to have discovered this...

Gene editing patent ruling sways fortune of biotech hopefuls

NEW YORK (AP) - In a highly anticipated decision that could sway the fortunes of a handful of biotechnology companies, the federal patent office has turned back a challenge to patents covering a widely used method for editing genes.

Harvard, MIT research institute holds on to gene-editing patent rights

(Reuters) - A team of researchers affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University will keep valuable patents on a revolutionary gene-editing technology known as CRISPR, a U.S. patent agency has ruled. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office's Patent Trial and Appeal Board in Alexandria, Virginia on Wednesday dismissed a claim by a rival team, associated with the University of California at Berkeley and the University of Vienna in Austria, to have invented the technology first.

Europe ready to embrace first copies of biotech cancer drugs
Europe ready to embrace first copies of biotech cancer drugs

By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - Treatment with two important cancer drugs is about to get much cheaper in Europe with a cut-price copy of Roche's blood cancer drug Rituxan likely to hit the market imminently followed by a rival to its breast cancer medicine Herceptin. As cancer drug prices spiral, the arrival of the first biosimilars or copies of biotech drugs, ones made inside living cells, puts European oncologist in the forefront of a treatment shift that could slash costs and expand patient access. Copycat versions of Rituxan, also known as MabThera, and Herceptin have faced several delays in development in the past.

Could gene editing help avoid disease? Maybe
Could gene editing help avoid disease? Maybe

WASHINGTON (AP) - Don't expect designer babies any time soon - but a major new ethics report leaves open the possibility of one day altering human heredity to fight genetic diseases, with stringent oversight, using new tools that precisely edit genes inside living cells.

No designer babies, but gene editing to avoid disease? Maybe
No designer babies, but gene editing to avoid disease? Maybe

WASHINGTON (AP) - Don't expect designer babies any time soon - but a major new ethics report leaves open the possibility of one day altering human heredity to fight genetic diseases, with stringent oversight, using new tools that precisely edit genes inside living cells.

GENE EDITING

Graphic explains the CRISPR-Cas9 method of gene editing; 2c x 3 inches; 96.3 mm x 76 mm;

Applied Genetic Technologies posts 2Q profit

The Alachua, Florida-based company said it had profit of 11 cents per share. The results exceeded Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of three analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research ...

Genetic testing often overlooked for cancer risk women: study
Genetic testing often overlooked for cancer risk women: study

Doctors often fail to recommend or even discuss genetic testing of women at high risk for mutations associated with breast or ovarian cancer, a new study published Tuesday has found. "Women are very interested in genetic testing but many fail to receive it," said Allison Kurian, a Stanford University Medical School professor and lead author of the study published in JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association. Kurian and researchers at the University of Michigan based their findings on a survey of more than 2,500 women with stage 0 to stage 2 cancer two months after surgery.

Biotech industry blasts
Biotech industry blasts 'misguided' Trump travel ban

Bosses of more than 150 US biotech companies Tuesday criticised US President Donald Trump's travel ban against seven Muslim-majority countries, saying the sector stood to lose talented workers and its global dominance. The United States is the world's greatest developer of new medicines, a position reached by being able "to attract the best talent, wherever it is found," they wrote in a letter to science journal Nature Biotechnology. The letter bears the signatures of 166 founders and leaders of pharma and biotech companies such as Biogen, Ironwood Pharmaceuticals and Incyte, along with research institutions including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and...

Gene therapy allows deaf mice to hear: study
Gene therapy allows deaf mice to hear: study

Gene therapy delivered by a benign virus enabled deaf lab mice to hear for the first time, researchers said Monday, offering hope for people with genetic hearing impairments. The breakthrough could pave the way for gene-based treatments, they reported in two studies, published in Nature Biotechnology. "With more than 100 genes already known to cause deafness in humans, there are many patients who may eventually benefit from this technology," said Konstantina Stankovic, a professor at Harvard Medical School.

Tall tale: gene variants can add 2cm to your height
Tall tale: gene variants can add 2cm to your height

Researchers on Wednesday unveiled 83 rare gene variants which exert a strong influence on human height, with some capable of adding or subtracting more than two centimetres (0.8 inches). Previous research had shown that genetic inheritance determines more than 80 percent of a person's height. "Our latest discovery means that we can now explain over a quarter of the heritable factors involved in influencing a person's height," said Andrew Wood of the University of Exeter, a co-author of the study, published in the journal Nature.

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