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11 dead as Nigerian troops repel Boko Haram suicide bombers
11 dead as Nigerian troops repel Boko Haram suicide bombers

MAIDUGURI, Nigeria (AP) - Battling multiple bombers strapped with suicide vests, Nigerian troops and civilian self-defense fighters on Friday repelled the fiercest Boko Haram extremist attack in months on the key northeastern city of Maiduguri. Nine bombers and two civilians were killed, according to witnesses, soldiers and police.

North Korea says will reject Malaysian post-mortem of Kim Jong Nam
North Korea says will reject Malaysian post-mortem of Kim Jong Nam

By Emily Chow and Joseph Sipalan KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) - North Korea said it would "categorically reject" Malaysia's autopsy report on the death of the man identified by Malaysian authorities as the estranged half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Kim Jong Nam died in Kuala Lumpur this week after being assaulted at Kuala Lumpur International Airport with what was thought to be a fast-acting poison.

The Ferrari 812 Superfast Is Maranello
The Ferrari 812 Superfast Is Maranello's Most Powerful Production Car Ever

With its naturally-aspirated V12 producing 789 horsepower, it's also the fastest, hence the name.

Indonesian accused of Kim half-brother
Indonesian accused of Kim half-brother's murder 'duped': officials

An Indonesian woman arrested over the assassination of the North Korean leader's half-brother was "duped" into believing that she was taking part in a TV prank show, officials said Friday. Siti Aishah is among three people detained over the Cold War-style killing of Kim Jong-Nam in a Malaysian airport on Monday that South Korea says was carried out by female agents armed with poison working for Pyongyang. Malaysian police say that Kim Jong-Nam, the estranged elder brother of Kim Jong-Un, was preparing to board a plane to Macau when he was jumped by two women who squirted some kind of liquid in his face.

Deadly Baghdad car bomb claimed by Islamic State
Deadly Baghdad car bomb claimed by Islamic State

The death toll from a car bomb attack in a southern Baghdad neighborhood has reached 59 with 66 others injured, a police officer and medical sources said Friday. Authorities initially said the Thursday attack at an auto dealership in the al-Bayaa neighborhood killed at least 55 and wounded more than 60. The Islamic State group claimed credit for the bombing. IS, in a statement early Friday, said its fighters detonated bombs in a parked car among a gathering of Shiites in the Fifth Police district Thursday.

Zealandia Might Be The World
Zealandia Might Be The World's Smallest Continent, Not Austrailia

According to the Geological Society of America, the landmass is believed to have broken away from Gondwana 60-85 million years ago.

Are face transplants still research, or regular care?
Are face transplants still research, or regular care?

Is replacing a severely disfigured person's face with one from a dead donor ready to be called regular care, something insurers should cover? Mayo Clinic has raised that question by doing the first U.S. face transplant that's not part of research.

Trump
Trump's pick to lead health agency calls EpiPen issue 'disturbing'

By Susan Cornwell WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump's choice to lead an important health agency said on Thursday that the way pharmaceutical companies classify products as generic or branded needs to be reviewed in order to help hold down government spending, as she cited Mylan NV's EpiPen emergency allergy treatment. Seema Verma, Trump's nominee to lead the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), did not answer questions about whether the U.S. government should negotiate with pharmaceutical companies over drug prices. "I think what happened with ... the EpiPen issue is very disturbing," Verma said at her confirmation hearing before the...

FBI: White supremacist talked of Dylann Roof-type attack
FBI: White supremacist talked of Dylann Roof-type attack

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - A white supremacist with felony convictions in South Carolina bought a gun from an undercover FBI agent, telling the agent he planned an attack in "the spirit of Dylann Roof," authorities said Thursday.

More U.S. seniors taking multiple mind-altering drugs

By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - The number of older adults taking at least three prescriptions for psychotropic drugs - which includes opioids, antidepressants, antipsychotics and tranquilizers - has roughly doubled over the past decade, a recent U.S. study suggests. Nationwide, the number of annual doctor visits involving patients 65 and older who started or were already taking at least three psychotropic drugs surged from 1.5 million in 2004 to 3.68 million in 2013, the study estimated. "This is not among patients with diagnoses like depression, anxiety, or insomnia, but rather in patients with pain and in patients with no mental health or pain diagnosis," noted lead study author...

Quotes From Trump
Quotes From Trump's Outrageous Press Conference

"I am the least anti-Semitic person that you've ever seen in your entire life. No. 2: Racism. The least racist person."

How to Look Your Best No Matter How Old You Are: Get The No7 Offer Here
How to Look Your Best No Matter How Old You Are: Get The No7 Offer Here

A dermatologist who helps women look their best is sharing her secrets.

US flu vaccine a good match; season moderate so far
US flu vaccine a good match; season moderate so far

NEW YORK (AP) - This season's flu vaccine seems to be working pretty well, weakening the punch of a nasty bug that's going around, U.S. health officials said Thursday.

Spanish woman gives birth to healthy twins at age 64

MADRID (AP) - A doctor in northern Spain says a 64-year-old woman has given birth to healthy twins following her second successful pregnancy at an advanced age.

Weak thigh muscles tied to knee osteoarthritis in women

By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Women with weaker thigh muscles may be more likely to develop knee osteoarthritis, a recent study suggests. When women had less strength in muscles known as the knee extensors, or quadriceps, which help straighten the leg for standing, climbing and kicking, they were 47 percent more likely to develop knee arthritis than women who had stronger knee extensors, the study found. Weakness in the knee flexor muscles on the back of the legs, also known as hamstrings, was associated with 41 percent greater odds of knee osteoarthritis in women.

2017 Volkswagen Passat 2.0T Euro-Spec
2017 Volkswagen Passat 2.0T Euro-Spec

The best Passat we don't get.

Test can detect HIV within a week of infection: researchers
Test can detect HIV within a week of infection: researchers

Spain's top research institution said Thursday it has patented an HIV test that can detect the AIDS-causing virus within a week of infection, the fastest yet. A "biosensor" developed by scientists of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) detects the p24 antigen, a protein attached to the HIV virus, in human blood, the council said in a statement.

Where To Join The National Day Without Immigrants Boycott
Where To Join The National Day Without Immigrants Boycott

Find out if your city is joining in the protests against Donald Trump's anti-immigration executive orders.

House to unveil Obamacare bill after next week
House to unveil Obamacare bill after next week

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republican lawmakers plan to introduce their legislation to repeal and replace Obamacare after they return from next week's break, U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan told reporters on Thursday. Ryan did not give a specific date and added that lawmakers are waiting to see how congressional analysts "score" their proposal to reverse former Democratic President Barack Obama's health care law. The House is scheduled to return Feb. 27. (Reporting by David Morgan, Susan Heavey and Richard Cowan; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama)

Trump health pick says maternity coverage should be optional
Trump health pick says maternity coverage should be optional

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump's pick to lead the government's major health insurance programs says maternity coverage should be optional for patients.

Senate confirms Mulvaney as Trump
Senate confirms Mulvaney as Trump's budget director

The U.S. Senate on Thursday narrowly confirmed South Carolina congressman Mick Mulvaney to serve as White House budget director in a 51-49 vote that largely followed party lines. Underscoring the rocky reception that President Donald Trump's Cabinet nominees have had on Capitol Hill, the vote came as Republican Senator John McCain opposed Mulvaney along with 46 Democrats and two independents. McCain, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said on Wednesday he was concerned about Mulvaney's opposition to defense spending.

Language barriers may block access to kidney transplant waiting list

By Carolyn Crist (Reuters Health) - Kidney transplant candidates who live in ZIP codes with more non-English speakers are less likely to make it onto the U.S. active waiting list, according to a recent study. Cultural and educational barriers likely also play a role," said senior study author Edmund Huang of the Kidney Transplant Program at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California. "Transplant centers and referring nephrologists should recognize that these populations may need additional attention in guiding them through the evaluation process," he told Reuters Health.

AP FACT CHECK: Trump
AP FACT CHECK: Trump's iffy grasp of autism research

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump has weighed in on child autism, apparently without a complete grasp of the research.

Nearly 15,000 lost children seek parents in chaos of South Sudan
Nearly 15,000 lost children seek parents in chaos of South Sudan's war

By Siegfried Modola BENTIU (Reuters) - In the chaos of South Sudan's civil war, it took three years for Nyagonga Machul to find her lost children. Machul had travelled from her village to the capital when President Salva Kiir, an ethnic Dinka, fired his deputy Riek Machar, a Nuer, in 2013. The dismissal triggered a civil war in the world's newest nation that has increasingly been fought along ethnic lines.

China says bird flu spread slows, vows to stiffen controls
China says bird flu spread slows, vows to stiffen controls

The spread of a deadly strain of bird flu in China is slowing, health authorities said on Thursday, as they vowed to tighten controls on markets and the transport of live poultry to battle the virus. As many as 79 people died from H7N9 bird flu in January, the government has said, or up to four times more than the corresponding figure in previous years, stoking worries this season's spread of the virus could be the worst on record. From Sunday to Tuesday this week, eight new human infections of H7N9 avian flu were reported, indicating the rate had slowed from the previous reporting period, the National Health and Family Planning Commision said on its website.

Zimbabwe hit by allegations of bias in food aid
Zimbabwe hit by allegations of bias in food aid

By Jeffrey Moyo SEKE, Zimbabwe (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Wearing a torn shirt that hangs below his knees, 11-year-old Mirirai Gwauya sits under a tree near his home in eastern Zimbabwe eating wild fruits and reading aloud from an old primary school textbook. "There is no food at home. "We endured going to school hungry for some time, but in the end we dropped out." Zimbabwe's worst drought in 25 years has left more than 4 million people needing food aid during the peak of the lean season, which usually runs from January to the end of March.

Bite-mimicking malaria vaccine shows promise: studies
Bite-mimicking malaria vaccine shows promise: studies

A malaria vaccine that mimics a mosquito bite yielded encouraging results in human trials, its makers said Thursday, raising hopes for thwarting a parasite that kills a child every two minutes. The candidate drug, called PfSPZ, provided up to 100 percent protection for 10 weeks in a trial in Germany, although a trial in real life conditions in Mali gave a lower level of defence, they reported in two separate studies. "We are extremely encouraged by these findings," said Stephen Hoffman of vaccine developer Sanaria, a company based in Maryland.

Famine threat looms as children starve in Boko Haram-hit northeast Nigeria
Famine threat looms as children starve in Boko Haram-hit northeast Nigeria

By Kieran Guilbert MAIDUGURI, Nigeria (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Slumped in his mother's lap in a health clinic in northeast Nigeria, three-year-old Hassan was too drained to cry or protest as the nurse wrapped a tape measure tightly around his arm. After weeks of fever, vomiting and diarrhoea - telltale signs of malnutrition - his gaunt face and glazed eyes were listless despite his mother's efforts to coax him into eating from a packet of nutritious peanut-based paste. "I'm scared we'll end up coming back ... there is no food to eat here," said Hassan's mother, Kolo Adam, who fled with her six children to Maiduguri's Bakassi camp for the...

I
I'm cycling to save lives

Weaving through some of Surrey and Sussex's most picturesque scenery with 18,000 other cyclists - many of them hobbyists - it's no wonder the London to Brighton Bike Ride is seen as such an iconic journey. For 59-year-old Andrew Wisdom (above), taking part in the 54-mile bike ride - Europe's oldest charity organised bicycle event - could hardly be more profound. Having suffered a heart attack in October 2015, then a second episode of chest pains 10 weeks later on an aeroplane to Australia, he feels he owes pretty much everything to the BHF.

Saddle up to save a life
Saddle up to save a life

Signing up for an exercise based challenge always feels good: there's the sense of pushing yourself a little bit further than usual, plus all the health benef­its that come with the training and event itself. All that pedal power won't just improve your own heart health - it will directly benef­it the health of the nation, by helping to fund pioneering research by the British Heart Foundation (BHF). London to Brighton is Europe's oldest charity organised bicycle event, and has been the BHF's flagship fundraiser every summer since 1976.

Vitamin D can protect against colds, flu: study claims
Vitamin D can protect against colds, flu: study claims

Taking extra vitamin D can protect against colds, flu and other respiratory infections, said a study Thursday which reopened a debate on the usefulness of over-the-counter supplements. A review of 25 clinical trials in 14 countries, some with conflicting results, yielded "the first definitive evidence" of a link between vitamin D and flu prevention, researchers claimed in The BMJ medical journal. Many people, especially in grey, cloudy climes, do not have enough vitamin D.

Cameroon confirms H5N8 bird flu outbreak in the north: OIE
Cameroon confirms H5N8 bird flu outbreak in the north: OIE

Cameroon has confirmed a case of the highly contagious H5N8 bird flu virus in the northern part of the country, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Wednesday, citing a report from the Cameroonian livestock ministry. The virus was found early January in exotic peacocks, in village chickens and in ducks, the ministry said.

Bird-flu deaths rise in China, shutting poultry markets
Bird-flu deaths rise in China, shutting poultry markets

China is experiencing its deadliest outbreak of the H7N9 bird-flu strain since it first appeared in humans in 2013, killing 79 people in January alone and spurring several cities to suspend live poultry trade. The National Health and Family Planning Commission said on Wednesday that by the end of January a total of 100 people had died in the current bird flu season, which commonly emerges in winter and continues into the spring. H7N9, a subtype of influenza that affects both birds and humans, was first discovered in China in 2013.

Kids with ADHD have some smaller brain regions than normal

LONDON (AP) - Children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder have several brain regions that are slightly smaller than usual, more evidence that the disorder should be considered a neurological condition, a new study says.

Suspect in N. Korea killing to appear in Malaysia court
Suspect in N. Korea killing to appear in Malaysia court

A suspect in the killing of the half-brother of North Korea's leader was due to appear in court Thursday, as Malaysian police searched for others involved in an assassination Seoul says was carried out by Pyongyang's agents. Police said the 28-year-old woman, who was carrying a Vietnamese passport, was held overnight following her arrest, after reports said two female assassins sprayed toxins in the victim's face at Kuala Lumpur International Airport. "We are looking for more suspects," Selangor state police chief Abdul Samah Mat told AFP, but declined to say how many were being sought, or their nationalities.

Fox News Poll: Trump
Fox News Poll: Trump's first presidential report card

Its been about three weeks since President Donald Trumps inauguration and voters are split over his job performance: 48 percent approve and 47 percent disapprove.

Hackett says
Hackett says 'angry' brother beat him

Australian swimming great Grant Hackett has posted a photo of himself on social media with cuts and bruises to his face and accused his brother of assault, a day after the triple Olympic champion was arrested for a disturbance at his family home. Hackett, who has struggled with drug and alcohol problems away from the pool, was detained by Gold Coast police on Wednesday after suffering a "breakdown" at his parents' home, his father told local media. The swimmer's brother Craig later told reporters that Hackett was a "danger to himself and to the community" and that his family was unable to help him alone.

Swimming-Hackett says 'angry' brother beat him

Australian swimming great Grant Hackett has posted a photo of himself on social media with cuts and bruises to his face and accused his brother of assault, a day after the triple Olympic champion was arrested for a disturbance at his family home. Hackett, who has struggled with drug and alcohol problems away from the pool, was detained by Gold Coast police on Wednesday after suffering a "breakdown" at his parents' home, his father told local media. The swimmer's brother Craig later told reporters that Hackett was a "danger to himself and to the community" and that his family was unable to help him alone.

Vitamin D can protect against colds, flu: study claims
Vitamin D can protect against colds, flu: study claims

Taking extra vitamin D can protect against colds, flu and other respiratory infections, said a study Thursday which reopened a debate on the usefulness of over-the-counter supplements. A review of 25 clinical trials in 14 countries, some with conflicting results, yielded "the first definitive evidence" of a link between vitamin D and flu prevention, researchers claimed in The BMJ medical journal. Many people, especially in grey, cloudy climes, do not have enough vitamin D.

Transplant patient holds her own heart after lifesaving operation
Transplant patient holds her own heart after lifesaving operation

For decades, Lisa Salberg, 48, grappled with complications from a dangerous form of heart disease called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. When her heart began to fail, her doctors decided she need a transplant. Earlier this month, Salberg was matched to a new heart and underwent the lifesaving transplant surgery.

Bite-mimicking malaria vaccine shows promise: studies
Bite-mimicking malaria vaccine shows promise: studies

A malaria vaccine that mimics a mosquito bite yielded encouraging results in human trials, its makers said Thursday, raising hopes for thwarting a parasite that kills a child every two minutes. The candidate drug, called PfSPZ, provided up to 100 percent protection for 10 weeks in a trial in Germany, although a trial in real life conditions in Mali gave a lower level of defence, they reported in two separate studies. "We are extremely encouraged by these findings," said Stephen Hoffman of vaccine developer Sanaria, a company based in Maryland.

ADHD a
ADHD a 'brain disorder', not just bad behaviour: study

People with ADHD have slightly smaller brains than those without the condition, according to a study released Thursday which insisted it is a physical disorder and not just bad behaviour. The largest analysis to date of the brains of people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder found "structural differences" and evidence of delayed development compared with non-sufferers, researchers reported. "The results from our study confirm that people with ADHD have differences in their brain structure and therefore suggest that ADHD is a disorder of the brain," said the study's lead author, Martine Hoogman of Radboud University Medical Centre in the Netherlands.

FDA approves Valeant
FDA approves Valeant's drug to treat plaque psoriasis

(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc's Siliq to treat adults with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis is an autoimmune disorder that occurs more commonly in patients with a family history of the disease, and most often begins in people between the ages of 15 and 35. Plaque psoriasis, in which patients develop thick, red skin with flaky, silver-white scales, is the most common form of the disease. (http://bit. ...

Diseased rat urine kills New Yorker in outbreak of rare illness
Diseased rat urine kills New Yorker in outbreak of rare illness

Diseased rat urine has killed at least one person and sickened two others in New York City in an outbreak of a rarely seen infection, prompting calls from city officials on Wednesday for a renewed effort to cull the rodent population. The outbreak of leptospirosis began in December and all three cases were traced to a single-block area of the Bronx, New York's northernmost borough, the city's health department said in a statement on Tuesday. Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection spread by rodents and certain other animals that can cause fever, vomiting and kidney damage.

Cluster of rat-related disease discovered in Bronx section of New York, 1 dead
Cluster of rat-related disease discovered in Bronx section of New York, 1 dead

A rare bacterial outbreak in New York City linked to rats has infected three people, one of whom died, according to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Three people in one city block in the Bronx were diagnosed with leptospirosis within the last two months, after they had become severely ill, the department reported yesterday. "The Health Department has identified a cluster of three cases of leptospirosis on one block in the Concourse area of the Bronx," officials from the New York City Health Department said in a statement yesterday.

Republican McCain wavers on Trump
Republican McCain wavers on Trump's White House budget chief nominee

Senator John McCain said on Wednesday he is leaning against voting to confirm U.S. President Donald Trump's nominee to be White House budget director, Representative Mick Mulvaney. A Senate vote on Mulvaney, a leading member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus who represents South Carolina, was expected on Thursday at 7 a.m. Wavering support from McCain alone would not jeopardize Mulvaney's confirmation, but the Arizona senator and former presidential candidate could sway other Republicans.

Wide variation in willingness of ER doctors to prescribe painkillers

By Gene Emery (Reuters Health) - A national comparison of emergency room physicians has uncovered a broad range of prescribing patterns for painkillers, and high-volume prescribers may be encouraging long-term use of the drugs among their elderly patients. Based on medical histories of more than 377,000 Medicare recipients, researchers found that doctors considered frequent prescribers were 300 percent more likely to give out prescriptions for painkillers than low-volume physicians in the same hospital, and those heavy-prescribers were 30 percent more likely to give their patients prescriptions for longer periods. "These results suggest that an increased likelihood of receiving an opioid...

Survival rates for extremely preterm babies improving in U.S.

By Gene Emery (Reuters Health) - The first decade of the 2000s saw a small but significant increase in the survival of extremely premature infants without early neurodevelopmental problems, according to a study of nearly 4,500 babies born at 11 U.S. medical centers. "We've seen a slight increase in the number of infants who survived without signs of impairment at 2 years of age," chief author Dr. Noelle Younge of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, told Reuters Health. Understanding the likelihood of survival and the odds for disabilities can help doctors counsel parents of extreme preemies about their child's prognosis, the study team writes.

Trump administration ushers in changes to Obama health law
Trump administration ushers in changes to Obama health law

The Trump administration took steps Wednesday intended to calm jittery insurance companies and make tax compliance with former President Barack Obama's health law less burdensome for some people. But the ...

NYC officials: 1 person dies, 2 ill from rat-related disease

NEW YORK (AP) - New York City health department officials are targeting a Bronx neighborhood after one person died and two others became severely ill from contracting a rare disease transmitted by rats.

Top News: Health

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