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A Spanish quest to hand down prehistoric secrets
A Spanish quest to hand down prehistoric secrets

Cáceres (Spain) (AFP) - It's dark and surprisingly warm in a cave in western Spain that hides our most intimate connection to the prehistoric past -- hand silhouettes painted tens of thousands of years ago. Archeologist Hipolito Collado and his team had not entered the Maltravieso Cave in the city of Caceres for close to a year to avoid damaging the 57 faded hands that adorn the walls, precious remnants of a far-flung piece of history we know little about. Do they tell us anything about the role of women during the Paleolithic era that ended some 10,000 years ago?

Top Scientific Photos Include SpaceX And Chernobyl
Top Scientific Photos Include SpaceX And Chernobyl

What is your favorite science-related picture?

Middle Stone Age Man Learned To Make Serrated Edges
Middle Stone Age Man Learned To Make Serrated Edges

Man learned to make serrated weapons some 77,000 years ago, far earlier than previously believed.

Elon Musk Compared To Albert Einstein
Elon Musk Compared To Albert Einstein

Elon Musk is changing the world for humanity. Albert Einstein redefined the universe for humanity.

Hubble just delivered one of the most gorgeous space photos ever
Hubble just delivered one of the most gorgeous space photos ever

The past few weeks have been jam-packed with stunning imagery from Saturn, delivered courtesy of the Cassini spacecraft. Now, almost as if to say "Hey, remember me?", NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has grabbed our attention with what is almost certainly one of the most spectacular photos it's ever managed to capture. The photo, which was released this week, has a whole lot going on, including some tricky perspective work that, as NASA points out, really messes up the scale of everything you're seeing. The photo you see above - available in full resolution here - shows a couple of interesting celestial sights. For starters, the colorful collection of lights on the right is a...

The Science Of Human Cloning
The Science Of Human Cloning

While some novels depict human cloning as systematic and as easy as a car part assembly line, in reality the process is a bit more complex.

Budget Cuts Could Lead to More Radon Deaths
Budget Cuts Could Lead to More Radon Deaths

In 2010, Gail Orcutt was diagnosed with lung cancer. The diagnosis came as a shock to the nonsmoker, who eventually had her entire left lung removed. She had no idea how she could have developed the disease until she came across an article about radon and learned it was the top cause of lung cancer among nonsmokers. She also discovered that her state, Iowa, has particularly high levels of radon, so she immediately had her home tested and found elevated levels. Remediation, the removal of radon from her home, was a simple process that took one day and left her wishing she had done it years ago. ...

Horseman rides across US to bring attention to Agent Orange
Horseman rides across US to bring attention to Agent Orange

The two things Colt Romberger and his father had most in common, the ones that made them best friends as well as father and son, were a deep affection for horses and an equally deep pride in having served their country in times of war. On Monday the compact, muscular 32-year-old Iraq war veteran will begin that journey through big-city streets, across desert sand and over mountain ranges and prairies, aboard a handsome gray-and-black 4-year-old quarter horse named Gus. Along the way he hopes to accomplish several things: raise money for veterans causes through a nonprofit foundation he's established, tell the public about the devastating, deadly effect the use of Agent Orange is having on...

Why And How Aliens May Know Humans Exist
Why And How Aliens May Know Humans Exist

It might be too late for us to withdraw back into invisibility, but maybe not for other intelligent alien civilizations out there.

6 Extreme Places Where Life Thrives On Earth
6 Extreme Places Where Life Thrives On Earth

Life adapts and survives in even the most unforgiving environments on Earth.

Power Player Plus: Jim Ferguson
Power Player Plus: Jim Ferguson

Jim Ferguson of ATF on how technology helps them solve crimes

Mysterious & Mythical Animals (Real or Not) Capture Human Interest
Mysterious & Mythical Animals (Real or Not) Capture Human Interest

This article originally appeared on The Conversation. The recent photographing of a live night parrot in Western Australia brought much joy. Another Australian species that inspires dedicated searchers is the Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine.

Citizen Scientists Make Aurora Discovery
Citizen Scientists Make Aurora Discovery

A collaboration between aurora-hunting citizen scientists and a team of professional researchers has resulted in the discovery of a completely new type of aurora. The aurora, more commonly known as the northern or southern lights, form when electrically charged particles collide with the gases in our upper atmosphere.

7 Facts About Psychopaths You Probably Didn
7 Facts About Psychopaths You Probably Didn't Know

Psychopathy as a term has been inconsistently used in the medical community for years.

Only a superweapon can kill superbacteria, and humanity finally found it
Only a superweapon can kill superbacteria, and humanity finally found it

Antibiotic immunity is leading us into an age of unstoppable superbacteria, but one Oregon scientist has a plan to reverse the tide by rewriting bacterial DNA with a sophisticated new tool: PPMOs.

Thousands brave weather to protest Trump climate policies
Thousands brave weather to protest Trump climate policies

SEATTLE (AP) - Thousands of people across the U.S. marched in rain, snow and sweltering heat Saturday to demand action on climate change - mass protests that coincided with President Donald Trump's 100th day in office and took aim at his agenda for rolling back environmental protections.

Leonardo DiCaprio used a standard, office file folder for his climate march sign, lol
Leonardo DiCaprio used a standard, office file folder for his climate march sign, lol

Look, let me start by saying Leonardo DiCaprio has done a lot to combat climate change.  He produced a climate change documentary titled Before the Flood that dropped in 2016. He has a foundation "dedicated to the long-term health and wellbeing of all Earth's inhabitants." The foundation has given $61 million to causes that align with that mission statement. He talks about climate change all the time. And, also, he was among the ~200,000 people in Washington, D.C. on Saturday to protest a White House that very much does not share his (scientifically valid) concern for the damage people are doing to the climate. SEE ALSO: Trump's big EPA website change should make you...

Turkey purges 4,000 civil servants, bans TV dating programs

ISTANBUL (AP) - Turkey passed two new decrees Saturday - one that expelled more than 4,000 civil servants and another that banned television dating programs.

Here
Here's What Happens When a Drone Falls On Your Head

One of the first tests by the FAA and its university research teams involved dropping a drone on the head of a crash test dummy. Both steel debris and the wood block caused significantly more damage to the dummy than the drone, which absorb much of the impact because it's made of more flexible materials.

All the best signs from Climate Marches around the world
All the best signs from Climate Marches around the world

In Trump's America, marching has become a weekly activity.  One week after the massive March for Science, people across the country and around the world, including Leonardo DiCaprio and Richard Branson, took to the streets on Saturday for the People's Climate March. At least 200,000 people marched in D.C., the march's organizers said Saturday afternoon.  Time-lapse, bird's-eye video shows thousands of protesters marching toward White House for action on climate change https://t.co/yoYEIbNWAO pic.twitter.com/jNpi7WceZi - CNN (@CNN) April 29, 2017 An event that predates the Trump administration, the Climate March this year is getting a little more attention considering...

Brazil
Brazil's indigenous tribes protest against land theft

Brasília (AFP) - Fed up with endless encroachment on their ancestral lands, leaders of Brazil's many indigenous tribes went to the capital Brasilia to speak out this week. "They're prejudiced," said Alvaro Tucano, one of the tribal members taking part in a week-long camp outside the government complex.

Not All Cultures Have Numbers, but How Do They Tell Time?
Not All Cultures Have Numbers, but How Do They Tell Time?

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Cassini on its final mission sends back closest ever photos of Saturn's rings
Cassini on its final mission sends back closest ever photos of Saturn's rings

Nasa's space probe Cassini, which is on its final mission of performing 22 planned dives through the rings of Saturn, has sent back spectacular images from space. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) used the Deep Space Network (a group of telescopes that communicate with distant objects in space) to pick up Cassini's far-off signal. As it dove through the gap, Cassini came within 3,000km of Saturn's cloud tops and within about 300km of the innermost visible edge of the rings.

Antarctica Blood Falls mystery solved? Find out the source of the red water
Antarctica Blood Falls mystery solved? Find out the source of the red water

The source of Antarctica's gruesome looking Blood Falls has finally been discovered putting an end to the mystery of where the red water came from. Researchers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks have now concluded that the blood resembling liquid is iron-rich brine that comes from a more than million-year-old lake trapped beneath the Taylor Glacier. It is the same process that gives iron a dark red colour when it rusts.

Science Shows Might Just Save the World
Science Shows Might Just Save the World

This article originally appeared on The Conversion. 

Dozens Of Facts About Space And The Solar System [PHOTOS]
Dozens Of Facts About Space And The Solar System [PHOTOS]

The general rule is that dark matter holds galaxies together and dark energy drives the expansion of the universe.

Soul-searching scientists struggle to get message across
Soul-searching scientists struggle to get message across

Vienna (AFP) - "We mortals do not understand you." That's the heartfelt cry from former UN climate chief Christiana Figueres, pleading with scientists to use everyday language to help counter growing public mistrust. Figueres was giving one explanation of why scientists are struggling to get their message across to a sceptical public at a major conference in Vienna this week. "I think it's the conceitedness, in a way," said Heike Langenberg, chief editor of the journal Nature Geoscience.

NASA
NASA's meteorite-resistant space fabric is like futuristic chainmail

NASA is usually so busy showing off all the awesome stuff it finds out in space that it's easy to lose track of the cool projects it's working on here on Earth, but the new "space fabric" designed by engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is just too cool to overlook. Like some kind of futuristic chainmail, it not only looks ridiculously awesome, it's also a potential solution for protecting space-faring astronauts from debris like meteorites.  The design of the fabric, which was led by JPL engineer Raul Polit Casillas, is such that it's both flexible and highly durable against impacts. It's the same basic premise that led medieval combatants to create chainmail, and...

Review: Coal terminal would boost global climate-warming gas
Review: Coal terminal would boost global climate-warming gas

SEATTLE (AP) - A coal-export terminal proposed in Washington state would increase cancer risks for some residents, make rail accidents more likely and add millions of metric tons of climate-changing greenhouse gas globally every year, according to an environmental study released Friday.

Robots, high-tech tools join battle against invasive species
Robots, high-tech tools join battle against invasive species

WASHINGTON (AP) - A robot zaps and vacuums up venomous lionfish in Bermuda. A helicopter pelts Guam's trees with poison-baited dead mice to fight the voracious brown tree snake. A special boat with giant winglike nets stuns and catches Asian carp in the U.S. Midwest.

Scientists just discovered something awesome about the soil on Mars
Scientists just discovered something awesome about the soil on Mars

Humans will one day walk on Mars and while it almost certainly won't happen on the fever-dream timeline that Donald Trump seems to think is possible, it'll definitely happen sooner rather than later. The technology to get us there either already exists or is in active development, but what about once we arrive? The first Mars travelers are going to need a place to stay, and researchers from UC San Diego may have just figured out how those brave adventurers will build the very first human structure on the Red Planet. The research, which was published in Scientific Reports, reveals that the soil on Mars is particularly well-suited to brick making. In fact, the dirt is so easily formed into...

Climate Change In The Ocean Hurts Algae The Marine Environment Needs
Climate Change In The Ocean Hurts Algae The Marine Environment Needs

Carbon dioxide is going to change the ocean's pH level, and that climate change will hurt a special type of algae that lots of other marine life relies on to survive.

Your weekend hate read is this ridiculously dumb New York Times op-ed
Your weekend hate read is this ridiculously dumb New York Times op-ed

It didn't take long for the controversial new editorial writer a the New York Times to deliver the goods - the goods in this case being tired and weak excuses for why mainstream media publications should give credence to climate change deniers.  On Friday afternoon, the Times published  the first column from Bret Stephens, in which he argues "ordinary citizens also have a right to be skeptical of an overweening scientism" in relation to climate change. SEE ALSO: We're about to test out hacking the Earth's climate. That should scare and inspire you. While the Times doesn't seem to have any writers extolling the flat earth theory or delving into the issues around...

Scientists develop an imaging technique for looking through concrete
Scientists develop an imaging technique for looking through concrete

Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have developed imaging technology that lets them detect corrosion in steel structures, even when it's encased in thick concrete.

This Startup Has a Natural Solution to the $2.6 Trillion Food Waste Problem
This Startup Has a Natural Solution to the $2.6 Trillion Food Waste Problem

"We need to build a system that allows us to feed the population in a much more efficient manner," says James Rogers, CEO of Apeel Sciences. It's about better utilizing the food that we already grow-a tremendous amount of which ends up spoiling before it ever reaches consumers. The U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organizations estimates that the global cost of food waste is a whopping $2.6 trillion per year.

Where is MH370? Scientists Say They Have 'Credible Information' for Location
Where is MH370? Scientists Say They Have 'Credible Information' for Location

It is now more than three years since Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 disappeared, and there is growing evidence that the search authorities have been looking for the aircraft in the wrong place. An underwater search of a 120,000 square kilometer area of the Indian Ocean, off Western Australia, has so far failed to find any evidence of the crash site. Initial evidence on the aircraft flight path was through satellite data (SatCom) from Inmarsat.

Rivals trade blame over Macedonia parliament violence
Rivals trade blame over Macedonia parliament violence

Macedonia's rival political parties traded blame Friday for an eruption of violence in the unstable Balkan country's parliament which left about 100 people injured. The chaos in Skopje broke out on Thursday evening, with dozens of nationalist demonstrators -- including a group of masked men -- breaking a police cordon and storming parliament in anger over a vote for a new speaker, an ethnic Albanian. The riots, which came after two years of political crisis, drew widespread condemnation, with NATO and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan echoing the worries expressed by the European Union and Washington.

Scientists Discovered the Trick to Actually Getting Over Your Ex
Scientists Discovered the Trick to Actually Getting Over Your Ex

Here's how you do it.

This Polymer Folds Itself Into Origami Structures
This Polymer Folds Itself Into Origami Structures

Using light and multiple layers of polymer film, the new method can be used by "anybody with PowerPoint and a projector," according to researchers who developed it.

Scientists May Be Able to Predict Dangerous Solar Storms
Scientists May Be Able to Predict Dangerous Solar Storms

Solar storms can be potentially catastrophic, and new research may finally allow us to understand and predict them.

Scientists Deliver Insulin Using LEDs and a Smartphone
Scientists Deliver Insulin Using LEDs and a Smartphone

A new technique involving red LED light and engineered human cells could deliver insulin without any needles.

Scientists Don't Know What This New Celestial Phenomenon Is So They're Calling It Steve
Scientists Don't Know What This New Celestial Phenomenon Is So They're Calling It Steve

It's a bird… it's a plane… it's Steve?

Astronomers Find First Pulsar Orbiting Black Hole
Astronomers Find First Pulsar Orbiting Black Hole

Astronomers say a pulsar, which is the lighthouse of stars, is orbiting a black hole in the constellation Sagittarius.

Trump moves to lift bans on Arctic drilling
Trump moves to lift bans on Arctic drilling

US President Donald Trump signed an executive order aimed at lifting bans on drilling for oil and gas in offshore Arctic and Atlantic areas, saying it would pull in "billions of dollars" for America and create jobs. "Our country's blessed with incredible natural resources, including abundant offshore oil and natural gas reserves, but the federal government has kept 94 percent of these offshore areas closed for exploration and production," the president said before journalists in the White House.

NASA
NASA's Kepler Catches Neptune's Weather During Sun Orbit

Neptune appears to be moving backward in its orbit in these images taken by the Kepler spacecraft, but it's all a trick.

The mystery of Antarctica
The mystery of Antarctica's Blood Falls has finally been solved

When explorers discovered the seemingly bloodstained face of the Taylor Glacier in Antarctica in the early 1900s, they thought it was red algae that colored the macabre falls oozing from the ice.Scientists later theorized that it was neither blood nor

Space: Trump's Least Controversial Frontier

The first 100 days of Donald Trump's presidency have been no less rife with controversy and political infighting than his campaign. As the new administration settled into the White House, it unleashed a torrent of new policy plans and executive orders for the public to debate, producing a flood of stories competing for the public's attention. But one area in particular seems to have flown under the radar, prompting no outrage and little parsing from Trump's critics: the nation's space policy.

Illegal Pot Use Is Rising in States That Have Legalized Medical Marijuana
Illegal Pot Use Is Rising in States That Have Legalized Medical Marijuana

In recent years, illegal marijuana use has risen faster in states that have legalized medical marijuana than in states without such laws, a new study finds. Although medical marijuana laws may benefit some people, changes to state laws also may have negative consequences for public health, the researchers, led by Deborah Hasin, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University in New York City, wrote in the study. As of November 2016, a total of 28 states have passed medical marijuana laws, according to the study, published today (April 26) in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.

Trademark Style: Why No One's Naming Their Baby Ivanka
Trademark Style: Why No One's Naming Their Baby Ivanka

Ivanka Trump just had to trademark her name in China to avoid copyright copycats, but she doesn't have to worry that new parents will infringe on her turf: The name Ivanka is wildly unpopular in the United States. In 2015, only about 20 in 1 million babies were named Ivanka, according to U.S. Social Security Administration data. In 2016, pregnancy and parenting site BabyCenter saw a spike in interest in the name Ivanka, possibly driven by the soon-to-be first daughter, but the name fell nearly 1,800 spots in popularity so far this year, and now sits at No. 3,818 in that site's popularity ranking.

Beware of Bogus Cancer Treatments, FDA Says
Beware of Bogus Cancer Treatments, FDA Says

Americans should be wary of products claiming to treat or cure cancer, as a number of products are falsely making these claims, according to the Food and Drug Administration. Today (April 25), the FDA sent warning letters to 14 U.S. companies saying that the businesses are breaking the law by making unproven claims about their products. "Consumers should not use these or similar unproven products, because they may be unsafe and could prevent a person from seeking an appropriate and potentially life-saving cancer diagnosis or treatment," Douglas Stearn, director of the Office of Enforcement and Import Operations at the FDA, said in a statement.

Top News: Science

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