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Court removes obstacle to releasing wolves in New Mexico
Court removes obstacle to releasing wolves in New Mexico

DENVER (AP) - A federal court on Tuesday removed an obstacle to the U.S. government's plan to release more endangered wolves in New Mexico over the state's objections, but it was not clear whether additional animals would be reintroduced under the Trump administration.

Father Hangs Baby Daughter on Facebook Live, Then Commits Suicide: Police
Father Hangs Baby Daughter on Facebook Live, Then Commits Suicide: Police

The gruesome footage was on the man's Facebook page for nearly 24 hours, authorities said.

With Secret Airship, Sergey Brin Also Wants to Fly
With Secret Airship, Sergey Brin Also Wants to Fly

Larry Page has his flying cars. Sergey Brin shall have an airship. Brin, the Google co-founder, has secretly been building a massive airship inside of Hangar 2 at the NASA Ames Research Center, according to four people with knowledge of the project.

US should stay in Paris climate accord: energy secretary
US should stay in Paris climate accord: energy secretary

The United States should stay in the Paris climate accord but renegotiate it, Energy Secretary Rick Perry said Tuesday, alleging that some European countries were not doing enough to curb emissions. A decision is expected by President Donald Trump next month on whether or not to stay in the landmark 2015 Paris Agreement limiting global carbon emissions, signed by 194 countries. "I'm not going to say I'm going to go tell the president of the United States, 'Let's just walk away from the Paris accord'," Perry said during the Bloomberg New Energy Finance conference in New York.

'Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite' gets release date, story mode

Fox Gamer: Capcom announces the release date and collector's edition for the next installment of the fan-favorite fighting franchise

'Cooper's Treasure' Star on Why He's Televising His Secret 'Treasure Map From Space'

"Cooper's Treasure" is currently being discovered by viewers, and there's good reason to board the sea-bottom series. The Discovery show follows the underwater expeditions of Darrell Miklos, who just might have the most valuable and unique treasure map in the world - or rather, from out of this world. Here's the backstory: Miklos' friend Gordon Cooper was one of NASA's first seven astronauts in the 1950s.

Michael Bloomberg called 'bullsh*t' on this energy technology
Michael Bloomberg called 'bullsh*t' on this energy technology

Michael Bloomberg, an outspoken environmentalist and former New York City mayor, had some harsh words for carbon capture and storage, the unproven technology that proponents say will turn fossil fuels into "clean" energy sources. "Carbon capture is total bullshit" and "a figment of the imagination," Bloomberg said on Monday, addressing a crowd at the Bloomberg New Energy Finance summit in New York. SEE ALSO: The Kentucky coal mining museum switches to solar power Carbon capture involves taking the emissions from coal and natural gas-burning power plants and industrial facilities, then burying the carbon deep underground or repurposing it for fertilizers and...

World
World's last male rhino getting help from Tinder dating app

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) - The world's last male northern white rhino has joined the Tinder dating app as wildlife experts make a last-chance breeding effort to keep his species alive.

'Breakthrough' bending wave technology turns your smartphone's display into one big loudspeaker
'Breakthrough' bending wave technology turns your smartphone's display into one big loudspeaker

Never mind getting rid of the headphone jack - what if your next mobile phone came without a speaker? It seems like an unthinkable proposition, however according to one company this could be the future of smartphone audio. UK-based tech firm Redux has developed a new type of surface audio technology which it claims removes the need for the frequently underwhelming micro speakers found in smartphones by instead channelling sound through the display.

Mysterious shapes and patterns discovered in Arctic and Antarctic sea floor
Mysterious shapes and patterns discovered in Arctic and Antarctic sea floor

Thousands of kilometres of the Arctic and Antarctic sea floors have been charted in an ambitious and highly detailed atlas of the polar seabed. Several strange shapes gouged out of the sea floor reveal some of the more dramatic periods of the poles' past. What we do know about the seabed here on Earth is perhaps at its scantiest in the remote polar regions.

Arkansas conducts nation
Arkansas conducts nation's 1st double execution since 2000

VARNER, Ark. (AP) - After going nearly 12 years without executing an inmate, Arkansas now has executed three in a few days - including two in one night.

The burger of the future comes from crickets, not cows
The burger of the future comes from crickets, not cows

Agriculture has come a long way in the past century. We produce more food than ever before -- but our current model is unsustainable, and as the world's population rapidly approaches the 8 billion mark, modern food production methods will need a radical transformation if they're going to keep up. But luckily, there's a range […]

Can Collisions Between Protons Create Quark-Gluon Plasma?
Can Collisions Between Protons Create Quark-Gluon Plasma?

Scientists associated with the ALICE collaboration at CERN's Large Hadron Collider have observed possible signatures of this hot and dense plasma even in collisions between protons.

Humans threaten crucial
Humans threaten crucial 'fossil' groundwater: study

Human activity risks contaminating pristine water locked underground for millennia and long thought impervious to pollution, said a study Tuesday that warned of a looming threat to the crucial resource. This suggests that deep wells, believed to bring only unsullied, ancient water to the surface, are "vulnerable to contaminants derived from modern-day land uses," study co-author Scott Jasechko, of the University of Calgary, told AFP. Groundwater is rain or melted ice which filters through Earth's rocky layers to gather in aquifers underground -- a process that can take thousands, even millions, of years.

Seoul: North Korea holds drill to mark military anniversary
Seoul: North Korea holds drill to mark military anniversary

PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) - South Korea's military said Tuesday that North Korea held major live-fire drills in an area around its eastern coastal town of Wonsan as it marked the anniversary of the founding of its military.

Tinder wants you to swipe right on this rhino to help save his species
Tinder wants you to swipe right on this rhino to help save his species

The world's most eligible bachelor is coming to Tinder - and he may not be who you expect. In a new campaign launched Tuesday, Tinder has partnered with the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in central Kenya to introduce users to Sudan, the last known male northern white rhino in existence. The platform hopes to save Sudan's species from extinction. SEE ALSO: 9 incredible ways we're using drones for social good As the last hope for all northern white rhinos, 42-year-old Sudan is one of the most protected animals on the planet, surrounded by armed guards at all times. He lives at the conservancy with the only two female northern white rhinos, Najin and Fatu. But he's been unable to...

Converting coal would help China
Converting coal would help China's smog at climate's expense

BEIJING (AP) - China's conversion of coal into natural gas could prevent tens of thousands of premature deaths each year. But there's a catch: As the country shifts its use of vast coal reserves to send less smog-inducing chemicals into the air, the move threatens to undermine efforts to rein in greenhouse gas emissions, researchers said Tuesday.

Arkansas kills inmate in latest of several planned executions
Arkansas kills inmate in latest of several planned executions

The southern US state of Arkansas, rushing to execute several inmates before a lethal drug expires at the end of the month, has carried out the first of two executions scheduled for Monday, the attorney general said. Jack Jones was executed after the US Supreme Court rejected an 11th-hour request from his attorneys asking the justices to reconsider a procedural issue from his trial. Arkansas had planned to put eight convicted murderers to death in 11 days -- a record, had it been carried out -- but four have won reprieves.

Royal Society: We must take action on AI machine learning to safeguard our futures
Royal Society: We must take action on AI machine learning to safeguard our futures

The Royal Society is calling for governments, academia and industry to work together urgently to ensure that machine learning develops into a technology able to benefit the UK as a whole, as an antidote to fear mongering about the future dangers of artificial intelligence. The UK's science academy has spent a year and a half working on the report, entitled "Machine Learning: the power and promise of computers that learn by example", in order to find out how the UK general public views machine learning.

How Exercise Can Benefit Your Brain
How Exercise Can Benefit Your Brain

Aerobic exercise, resistance training (such as weight lifting), and tai chi can all boost brain function in people older than 50, concludes a review published today in the British Journal of Spor...

Technology Is Killing Iceland
Technology Is Killing Iceland's Language

Technology doesn't speak Icelandic, so it's in danger of being lost to history.

UNEP chief confident US will not ditch Paris climate deal
UNEP chief confident US will not ditch Paris climate deal

The UN's environment chief is confident that the United States will not pull out of the Paris climate deal and expects a decision from Washington next month. Erik Solheim told AFP in an interview on Monday that even if the United States withdraws, China and the European Union will step in and take the lead to implement the global agreement on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

4 Things You Must Know About the Future of Space Travel

Or Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin rocket company, which aspires to launch six lucky tourists into space via a capsule, and that's testing its New Shepard rocket ahead of plans for commercial suborbital journeys in 2018. For those more inclined to board a spaceship, Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic aims to send tourists -- including world-renowned physicist Stephen Hawking -- aboard the SpaceShipTwo (a six-passenger aircraft) into space this year. If you're not interested in gliding into deep or suborbital space -- or you lack the funds to support a $250,000 journey aboard the Virgin Galactic -- you can enjoy epic space events from Earth this year, including watching the total solar eclipse on...

Tesla Supercharger Network: More Chargers In More Locations For 2017
Tesla Supercharger Network: More Chargers In More Locations For 2017

Tesla will be adding more chargers to its Supercharger network by the end of 2017.

Kitty Hawk unveils, begins testing of
Kitty Hawk unveils, begins testing of 'flying car' prototype

Trace Gallagher reports from Los Angeles

At least global warming may get Americans off the couch more
At least global warming may get Americans off the couch more

WASHINGTON (AP) - Global warming's milder winters will likely nudge Americans off the couch more in the future, a rare, small benefit of climate change, a new study finds.

Bill Maher Wants Everyone to Stop Talking About Colonizing Mars
Bill Maher Wants Everyone to Stop Talking About Colonizing Mars

"We hear a lot about putting America first. Let's put Earth first."

Supporting Science is as American as the Constitution and the Founding Fathers
Supporting Science is as American as the Constitution and the Founding Fathers

Scientific progress and American democracy are inextricably bound for their mutual survival.

How's Your Peripheral Vision?
How's Your Peripheral Vision?

Try these tests to find out!

Ten of the Quickest New Cars You Can Buy for Less Than $25,000
Ten of the Quickest New Cars You Can Buy for Less Than $25,000

Fossils may be earliest known multicellular life: study
Fossils may be earliest known multicellular life: study

Fossils accidentally discovered in South Africa are probably the oldest fungi ever found by a margin of 1.2 billion years, rewriting the evolutionary story of these organisms which are neither flora nor fauna, researchers said Monday. If verified as both fungal and multicellular, the 2.4 billion-year-old microscopic creatures -- whose slender filaments are bundled together like brooms -- could also be the earliest known specimens of the branch of life to which humans belong, they reported in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. Earth itself is about 4.6 billion years old.

Trump administration sanctions 271 in Syrian chemical attack
Trump administration sanctions 271 in Syrian chemical attack

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Trump administration issued sanctions Monday on 271 people linked to the Syrian agency responsible for producing non-conventional weapons, part of an ongoing U.S. crackdown on Syrian President Bashar Assad's alleged use of chemical weapons.

'Flying car' takes flight, cleared for sale and rec use

Kitty Hawk unveils its 'flying car' aircraft, cleared by FAA and to be made available to public by end of the year. Project backed by Google co-founder Larry Page

The EPA won
The EPA won't be shutting down its open data website after all

On Monday, they noticed an alarming message posted to the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) open data website, indicating it would shut down on Friday, April 28. The EPA apparently worried that Congress wouldn't pass a new continuing resolution to fund the government, and preemptively planned to end the Open Data service, according to the contractor managing the site, 3 Round Stones in Arlington, Virginia. The EPA disputes accounts that it ever intended to take down the website.

France probes Peugeot over emissions cheating
France probes Peugeot over emissions cheating

France on Monday opened a judicial enquiry into allegations carmaking giant PSA cheated on diesel pollution tests in the latest twist in a huge emissions scandal which hit the industry in 2015. A judicial source told AFP the Paris prosecutor on April 7 opened an investigation into claims that PSA might have rigged controls which could "render its merchandise dangerous for human or animal health". Fraud investigators have levelled similar allegations at PSA's French rival Renault, part government-owned and accused of cheating on pollution tests for diesel and petrol engines for over 25 years with the knowledge of top management.

Hernandez suicide notes ordered released ahead of funeral
Hernandez suicide notes ordered released ahead of funeral

BRISTOL, Conn. (AP) - Aaron Hernandez's family turned out Monday for a private funeral to say their farewells to the former NFL star, and a judge ordered that three suicide notes he left be turned over by the time he is buried.

Tour London's Natural History Museum in VR with David Attenborough
Tour London's Natural History Museum in VR with David Attenborough

You'll soon be able to take a hands-on tour of London's Natural History Museum with famed naturalist Sir David Attenborough, right from the comfort of your couch. The new project combines interactive virtual-reality (VR) technology with a TV documentary, in which a hologram of Attenborough takes viewers "behind the glass" at the museum. According to Sky, the European entertainment company behind the VR experience, the interactive technology will allow users to hold, tilt and peer inside the museum's collection of objects.

What Has 1,800 Teeth and a Suction Cup? A New Clingfish Species
What Has 1,800 Teeth and a Suction Cup? A New Clingfish Species

Nettorhamphos radula is a brand-new species found in a specimen jar from the 1970s in the collection of the Western Australian Museum in Welshpool, Australia. "It's the teeth that really gave away the fact that this is a new species," fish taxonomist Kevin Conway, one of the discoverers of the new fish and a professor at Texas A&M University, said in a statement. Clingfish are known for the suction-cup-like disk on their bellies, an appendage that lets them stick to surfaces in the face of forces of up to 150 times their own body weight.

The earth
The earth's got some space junk in its trunk, and the situation is not good

In this video, the European Space Agency takes us from outer space to Earth, depicting the exponentially worsening space debris problem along the way. Without a solution, humanity may soon find space travel impossible.

Kids Under 12 Shouldn't Take Codeine Drugs, FDA Says
Kids Under 12 Shouldn't Take Codeine Drugs, FDA Says

Children younger than 12 should not take codeine, a drug found in some cough and pain medicines, according to new rules from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that further restrict the use of this drug in kids. Parents should read the ingredient labels on pain and cough medicines to make sure that they don't contain codeine or another medication called tramadol before giving the medication to children, the agency said. The FDA said today (April 20) that it is making changes to its requirements for the labels of codeine-containing drugs because of reports that some children experience life-threatening breathing problems, and even die, after taking medicines that contain codeine.

A devastating eruption made thick, silvery 'Venus' hair' grow all over an underwater volcano
A devastating eruption made thick, silvery 'Venus' hair' grow all over an underwater volcano

Wavy-haired mats of bacteria cover the ocean floor for kilometres around the Tagoro volcano near the Canary Islands, whose summit lies about 130 metres under the sea surface. This silvery hair-like material turned out to be made of bacteria, according to a paper in Nature Ecology and Evolution. The researchers named it Thiolava veneris, Latin for Venus' hair.

Radiohead Just Got a New Species of Venezuelan Ants Named After Them
Radiohead Just Got a New Species of Venezuelan Ants Named After Them

In South America, there are ants capable of farming their own food that are known in the scientific community as Sericomyrmex, or "silky ants." Researchers from the Smithsonian recently discovered three new species of these fungus-eating insects, which differ from other Sericomyrmex because the female ants are covered in what Phys.org describes as a "white, crystal-like layer" with an as-of-yet unknown function. The scientists from the Smithsonian's Ant Lab who discovered these soft and mysterious new critters, Ana Ješovnik and Ted R. Schultz, have dubbed one of the species Sericomyrmex radioheadi.

Facebook Stories could end up driving younger users away instead of attracting them
Facebook Stories could end up driving younger users away instead of attracting them

Simply copying Snapchat might not be enough to keep the biggest social network relevant.

Aaron Hernandez's Brain Will Be Studied for CTE
Aaron Hernandez's Brain Will Be Studied for CTE

The brain of former NFL player Aaron Hernandez will be donated to an academic center that studies a brain disorder linked to playing football, according to Massachusetts officials. Hernandez, who was 27 and serving a life sentence in prison for murder, was found dead in his prison cell shortly after 3 a.m. on Wednesday (April 19), according to a statement from Joseph D. Early Jr., the district attorney of Worcester County in Massachusetts, who aided in the investigation of Hernandez's death. Although Hernandez's body was released on Wednesday, officials withheld some of his tissues, including his brain, until the cause of his death could be determined.

Strange Quarks at Large Hadron Collider Shed Light on Universe's 'Primordial Soup' Just After the Big Bang
Strange Quarks at Large Hadron Collider Shed Light on Universe's 'Primordial Soup' Just After the Big Bang

By observing collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)-one of the world's largest scientific research organizations-are learning more about the "primordial soup" that existed just after the Big Bang . In experiments, scientists have now shown proton collisions can produce a large number of strange particles-the first time this has been observed in collisions with anything other than heavy nuclei. A few billionths of a second after the Big Bang-currently the most widely accepted theory of how the universe was formed-elementary particles, including protons and neutrons, did not exist.

Treasure trove of bronze and copper reveals incredible speed of flash Inca invasion
Treasure trove of bronze and copper reveals incredible speed of flash Inca invasion

Around 1450 CE, the Incas attacked so fast that many of the Colla people of the hill fort of Ayawiri in Peru didn't have time to take their valuables with them as they abandoned their homes. Putting a number on how quickly people abandoned settlements hundreds of years ago is tricky using methods like radiocarbon dating, which are not very precise on those time scales.

How Bright Lights May Help Wake Patients from a Coma
How Bright Lights May Help Wake Patients from a Coma

Could shining bright lights on comatose patients to encourage their natural circadian rhythms help them awaken? The body's ability to awaken from a coma after severe brain injury is tied to its maintenance of its natural circadian rhythms, according to the study, which included 18 patients in various unconscious states. The scientists found that the chances of regaining consciousness may improve once the body falls back into its natural, healthy cycle of rising and falling body temperatures throughout the day.

Could Brain Stimulation Fight Obesity?
Could Brain Stimulation Fight Obesity?

People with obesity could benefit from magnetic or electric stimulation of the brain that helps them to eat less, a new review of studies finds. In the review, researchers looked at the latest work on two noninvasive brain-stimulation techniques, and found that for people with obesity, both electrical and magnetic pulses yielded promising, though very preliminary, results. The main target of the brain stimulation is usually a region called the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which is linked to dietary self-control, the review said.

Skip Your Run Today? Science Says You Can (Partly) Blame Your Friends
Skip Your Run Today? Science Says You Can (Partly) Blame Your Friends

Researchers analyzed information from more than 1 million people worldwide who tracked their exercise sessions with fitness trackers for more than five years, and shared their activity with friends over a social network. The researchers found that every extra 10 minutes that a person's friends ran on a given day caused that person to run for an extra 3 minutes that day. What's more, every additional kilometer run by a person's friends influenced that person to run an additional 0.3 kilometers.

Trump congratulates record-breaking astronaut on International Space Station

President Donald Trump called the International Space Station on Monday to congratulate astronaut Peggy Whitson for staying in space longer than any other American. Whitson, who has been at the ISS for 534 days and counting, is scheduled to stay there for at least another five months. Whitson, 57, also holds the record for being the oldest American woman in space, and the first woman to command the ISS twice.

Top News: Science

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