The Latest: DeVos says she'll advocate for HBCUs




WASHINGTON (AP) - The Latest on the Trump administration and historically black colleges and universities (all times local):

7:30 a.m.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos says she is a "strong supporter" of historically black colleges and universities.

In a statement released late Sunday, DeVos said she would "continue to be an advocate for them and for programs that make higher education more accessible to all students."

Some higher education officials questioned the Trump administration's support of historically black schools after the White House appeared to put a caveat on federal funds used by the colleges to obtain low-cost construction loans. President Donald Trump said his pledge to distribute money consistent with the Constitution doesn't affect his "unwavering support."

DeVos was criticized earlier this year for calling historically black colleges "pioneers" of school choice. She later acknowledged that the schools were created because African-Americans had been excluded from predominantly white schools.

___

3:10 a.m.

President Donald Trump has declared that his support for historically black colleges and universities remains "unwavering."

Trump sought to clarify an earlier statement that some higher education officials interpreted as meaning he planned to end a capital financing program. The operation in question is a program that helps these institutions repair, renovate and build new facilities. Congressional Black Caucus members criticized the move.

The earlier Trump statement was attached to a spending bill he signed Friday to keep the government operating through September.

Trump said in the signing statement that the administration "shall treat provisions that allocate benefits on the basis of race, ethnicity and gender ... in a manner consistent with the requirement to afford equal protection of the laws" under the due process clause of the Fifth Amendment.

COMMENTS

More Related News

Trump backs off Afghan withdrawal, lambasts Pakistan
Trump backs off Afghan withdrawal, lambasts Pakistan

"My instinct was to pull out" Trump admitted as he spoke of frustration with a war that has killed thousands of US troops and cost US taxpayers trillions of dollars. While Trump refused to offer detailed troop numbers, senior White House officials said he had already authorized his defense secretary to deploy up to 3,900 more troops to Afghanistan. A conflict that began in October 2001 as a hunt for the 9/11 attackers has turned into a vexed effort to keep Afghanistan's divided and corruption-hindered democracy alive amid a brutal Taliban insurgency.

Anger over rally violence boils over in Charlottesville
Anger over rally violence boils over in Charlottesville

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) - Anger boiled over at the first Charlottesville City Council meeting since a white nationalist rally in the city descended into violent chaos, with some residents screaming and cursing at councilors Monday night and calling for their resignations.

'That's too bad': Donald Trump criticised for response to news ten sailors missing, five injured after US warship collides with oil tanker near Singapore
'That's too bad': Donald Trump criticised for response to news ten sailors missing, five injured after US warship collides with oil tanker near Singapore

Ten US sailors were missing after a US destroyer collided with an oil tanker in southeast Asia, the second serious accident involving American Navy ships in the region in little more than two months. Returning to the White House on Sunday night, President Donald Trump responded to reporters' questions about the accident by saying: "That's too bad." Strongly criticised on social media for his response, he later tweeted: "Thoughts & prayers are w/ our @USNavy sailors aboard the #USSJohnSMcCain where search & rescue efforts are underway." Search and rescue efforts were launched  after the USS John S McCain was involved in a collision with the Alnic MC east of Singapore and the...

US military leaders await Trump decision on Afghan mission
US military leaders await Trump decision on Afghan mission

CAMP MOREHEAD, Afghanistan (AP) - Signaling that the U.S. military expects its mission to continue, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan on Sunday hailed the launch of the Afghan Army's new special operations corps, declaring that "we are with you and we will stay with you."

Pence on message, despite Trump
Pence on message, despite Trump's troubles at home

The day after President Donald Trump sparred with reporters on live television over assigning blame for violence at a white supremacist rally, White House aides were stunned, advisers were whispering their ...

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.