Wisconsin man accused of sending manifesto to Trump arrested after manhunt




  • In US
  • 2017-04-14 14:41:18Z
  • By Reuters
Joseph Jakubowski is pictured in this undated booking photo.
Joseph Jakubowski is pictured in this undated booking photo.

(Reuters) - A Wisconsin man accused of stealing an arsenal of weapons from a gun shop and sending an anti-government manifesto to President Donald Trump has been arrested after a massive manhunt, the Rock County Sheriff's Office said on Friday.

Joseph Jakubowski, 32, was taken into custody on Friday morning after being located overnight in Southwest Wisconsin, where he appeared to be camping in a rural area, the sheriff said in a statement.

A force of 150 law enforcement personnel, including Federal Bureau of Investigation agents, were searching for the suspect as of last weekend, authorities said.

The weeks-long hunt for Jakubowski was triggered by an April 4 break-in at a gun shop called Armageddon Supplies in the suspect's hometown of Janesville, about 70 miles (113 km) southwest of Milwaukee. The theft netted 18 guns and two silencers, said a criminal complaint filed in the Rock County Wisconsin Circuit Court in Janesville, Wisconsin.

A 161-page manifesto he mailed to Trump criticized officials from all levels of government and contained "anti-religious views," according to investigators on the case. A video posted to social media appears to show Jakubowski mailing the manifesto.

He was taken into custody without incident hours after a farmer called the Vernon County Sheriff's Office on Thursday night to report a suspicious person on his property in Readstown, Wisconsin. Authorities were making arrangements to return him to Rock County to face charges.

Jakubowski is charged with armed burglary, felony theft and possession of burglary tools, according to the complaint.

He previously served time in prison for trying to wrestle a gun away from a police officer.

His sister also found a letter he wrote before the break-in at the gun shop, explaining that he wanted to purchase weapons to protect himself and his family, but was barred from doing so because he is a convicted felon, according to court documents.


(Reporting By Barbara Goldberg in New York; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama and Alden Bentley)

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