Gaia Earth artwork to go on display in Derby Cathedral




  • In Science
  • 2022-09-22 05:15:48Z
  • By BBC
 

An illuminated planet Earth sculpture is to go on display at Derby Cathedral, having won praise elsewhere in the country.

Gaia is by UK artist Luke Jerram, whose previous artwork Museum of the Moon came to the cathedral in 2019.

The work will open to the public on Thursday and will remain in place until 16 October.

The Dean of Derby said the cathedral was the perfect setting for the "awe-inspiring and reflective" work.

'New perspective'

The Very Rev Dr Peter Robinson said thousands of people had visited the cathedral for previous exhibitions Peace Doves and Museum of the Moon.

He said the artwork was on display as part of the city arts festival Derby Festé and that the city would be running events to complement the work.

"The events programme organised under the Peace Doves earlier this year was very popular with visitors and I am sure that these will be equally well attended," he said.

"I think this artwork provides a new perspective of our place on the planet, a sense that societies of the Earth are all interconnected and that we have a responsibility toward one another.

"I hope that Gaia will inspire visitors to think about the significance of creation, our role as custodians on the planet and the environmental impact that we have on the natural world."

The installation measures seven metres (22ft) in diameter and is created from detailed NASA imagery of the Earth's surface.

It will revolve above the nave in Derby Cathedral, accompanied by a surround-sound composition by BAFTA award-winning composer Dan Jones.

Prof Keith McLay, from the University of Derby, said: "We are excited to see the exhibition in Derby and hope members of the public make the most of the fantastic opportunity to attend and see the work for themselves."

Steve Slater, artistic director of Derby Festé, said: "Gaia will amaze people, just as the Museum of the Moon did back in 2019."

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