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DAVOS DIARY: Train, not plane means scenery, carbon cutting
DAVOS DIARY: Train, not plane means scenery, carbon cutting

If you're coming to Davos this year, try to take the train instead of flying, organizers of the World Economic Forum said. Taking a train is much less...

What is biodiversity and how are we protecting it?
What is biodiversity and how are we protecting it?

The planet is experiencing its sixth mass extinction event, but it is hoped action can be agreed.

Scientists Uncover a Shady Web of Online Spider Sales
Scientists Uncover a Shady Web of Online Spider Sales

At first, it seems like any other unboxing video on YouTube: A young man presents the viewer with a sealed box, expresses his excitement at what might be...

Scientists
Scientists 'really surprised' after gene-editing experiment unexpectedly turn hamsters into hyper-aggressive bullies

Georgia State University scientists were "really surprised" after a gene-editing experiment led to Syrian hamsters showing high levels of aggression.

Scientists unravel the mystery of how elephants mourn their dead thanks to YouTube, report says
Scientists unravel the mystery of how elephants mourn their dead thanks to YouTube, report says

A team of Indian scientists found 39 videos showing Asian elephants mourning by roaring, holding vigil, and carrying the dead, per a new study.

Idea of superior Latino health outcomes may be false, new study suggests
Idea of superior Latino health outcomes may be false, new study suggests

A study calls into question the Latino Epidemiological Paradox, since it found that Latinos have a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease than non...

'Torturous' heat is breaking records and livelihoods in India. It's only going to get worse.

Millions in India and Pakistan have had to toil through the hottest spring on record, in conditions that scientists fear will soon regularly afflict billions...

Boeing
Boeing's Starliner catches up with space station

Boeing hopes the third time is the charm for the Starliner astronaut ferry ship on its test flight to the International Space Station.

Extreme drought unearthed a human skull in the Minnesota River. A forensic anthropologist says it may be 8,000 years old.
Extreme drought unearthed a human skull in the Minnesota River. A forensic anthropologist says it may be 8,000 years old.

Kayakers discovered a human skull in a drought-hit river last September. Experts say it likely belonged to a man who lived between 5,500 and 6,000 BC.

Major climate indicators set "alarming" records in 2021, U.N. says
Major climate indicators set "alarming" records in 2021, U.N. says

The ocean is more acidic than it's been in 26,000 years and hotter than ever as greenhouse gases continue to flood the atmosphere. Here's what it could mean ...

Ancient poop contains new clues about feasts eaten at the construction of Stonehenge more than 4,500 years ago
Ancient poop contains new clues about feasts eaten at the construction of Stonehenge more than 4,500 years ago

The coprolite was found in Durrington Walls, a settlement a few miles away from Stonehenge where those who built the monument stayed, scientists say.

Boeing Starliner capsule sets off after space station
Boeing Starliner capsule sets off after space station

Grounded earlier by software bugs and corroded valves, Boeing says the Starliner is finally ready for flight.

Carbon removal technologies to get $3.5B federal investment
Carbon removal technologies to get $3.5B federal investment

The federal government is investing in machines that suck giant amounts of carbon dioxide out of the air in the hopes of reducing damage from climate change....

Watch Boeing launch its Starliner spaceship for NASA on a do-over flight to the International Space Station
Watch Boeing launch its Starliner spaceship for NASA on a do-over flight to the International Space Station

NASA needs Boeing's Starliner spaceship to transport astronauts, but first the company has to fly it without errors. Last time it failed.

Watch NASA launch Boeing
Watch NASA launch Boeing's Starliner space taxi on second test mission aiming for space station

Two and a half years after an initial orbital flight test fell short, Boeing will try, try again to put its CST-100 Starliner space capsule through an...

Boeing is making a third attempt at reaching the International Space Station
Boeing is making a third attempt at reaching the International Space Station

Boeing is set to launch its Starliner space capsule to the International Space Station on Thursday in a crucial NASA test.

Prehistoric dolphin species discovered in landlocked Switzerland
Prehistoric dolphin species discovered in landlocked Switzerland

Twenty million years ago, Switzerland's low-lying parts were covered in an ocean teeming with fish, sharks and dolphins.

Boeing aims for new test launch of Starliner astronaut capsule
Boeing aims for new test launch of Starliner astronaut capsule

The aerospace company hopes its Starliner vehicle can finally prove its capabilities in orbit.

Extinction: Why scientists are freezing threatened species in
Extinction: Why scientists are freezing threatened species in 'biobanks'

Conservation scientists hope that preserving genetic material offers future insurance against extinction

Pugs cannot be considered "a typical dog" due to dire health issues, study finds
Pugs cannot be considered "a typical dog" due to dire health issues, study finds

Because pugs are at an increased risk of developing dozens of disorders, a new study said they can no longer be considered a typical dog.

Boeing Starliner capsule poised for high-stakes flight
Boeing Starliner capsule poised for high-stakes flight

NASA is confident Boeing's Starliner astronaut ferry ship is finally ready for prime time.

Elephants may mourn deaths, researchers find through YouTube videos
Elephants may mourn deaths, researchers find through YouTube videos

One of the most frequently observed behavior was guarding or keeping vigil over a dead elephant.

India hit with deadly flooding and heat waves at the same time
India hit with deadly flooding and heat waves at the same time

As floodwater sweeps homes away and trains off their tracks, a young Indian activist slams leaders for inaction in the face of "a real climate emergency."

Nasa InSight:
Nasa InSight: 'Marsquake' mission in its last months

The InSight probe will keep listening for tremors even as its power levels are in terminal decline.

An ancient tooth found in a cave proves an extinct species of archaic humans lived in southeast Asia over 130,000 years ago
An ancient tooth found in a cave proves an extinct species of archaic humans lived in southeast Asia over 130,000 years ago

Scientists were looking at how humans in southeast Asia today have some genes of an ancient human species mostly recorded in Siberia.

Celebrated Mexican archaeologist wins major Spanish award
Celebrated Mexican archaeologist wins major Spanish award

Eduardo Matos Moctezuma, a celebrated Mexican archaeologist who led the excavation of the Great Aztec Temple in Mexico City, won this year's Princess of...

New inquiry into Australian mother convicted of 4 homicides
New inquiry into Australian mother convicted of 4 homicides

An Australian state attorney general on Wednesday declined to pardon a mother convicted almost 20 years ago of smothering her four children to death and...

Climate change swells odds of record India, Pakistan heatwaves
Climate change swells odds of record India, Pakistan heatwaves

A UK study says record-breaking temperatures in NW India and Pakistan are now 100 times more likely.

InSight Mars lander nears the end of the road
InSight Mars lander nears the end of the road

NASA expects dwindling power to shut down the InSight Mars lander by the end of the year.

Tonga volcano eruption was powerful enough to reach space, new images from NASA show
Tonga volcano eruption was powerful enough to reach space, new images from NASA show

An underwater volcano erupted on January 15 near the Pacific island of Tonga. Scientists are beginning to understand just how big it was.

Mars dust is forcing NASA to say goodbye to its quake-hunting InSight lander early
Mars dust is forcing NASA to say goodbye to its quake-hunting InSight lander early

InSight detected more than 1,300 quakes on Mars, revealing the planet's inner layers for the first time. But NASA engineers couldn't clear the dust.

After Congress
After Congress' first hearing on UFOs in 50 years, some scientists want to be let in on the investigation

To better understand unidentified objects in the sky, we need to use satellites, fast-tracking cameras, and audio sensors, some scientists say.

Monkeypox cases in the UK are under
Monkeypox cases in the UK are under 'urgent investigation,' with 7 new infections

Monkeypox can cause puss-filled boils. It appears to be spreading through the community, which is "rare and unusual," a health official said.

NASA investigates another space helmet water leak
NASA investigates another space helmet water leak

While not as serious as a potentially life-threatening 2013 incident, NASA is taking no chances with the station's aging spacesuits.

Farm machinery exacting heavy toll on soil - study
Farm machinery exacting heavy toll on soil - study

Massive tractors and combine harvesters could be having a lasting impact on soil, a study suggests.

Perseverance: Nasa rover begins key drive to find life on Mars
Perseverance: Nasa rover begins key drive to find life on Mars

The Perseverance robot climbs a slope that could record evidence of ancient Martian biology.

See the photos of the "super flower blood moon"
See the photos of the "super flower blood moon"

Millions in the Americas, Europe and Africa were able to see the spectacular red glow of the total lunar eclipse.

'Blood moon' puts on lunar display across parts of Americas, Europe and Africa

A lunar eclipse early Monday produced a "blood moon," which occurs when the sun, Earth and moon align, and the moon passes through the darkest part of...

Tonga eruption was
Tonga eruption was 'record atmospheric explosion'

The January event was far bigger than any 20th Century volcanic event, or indeed any atom bomb test.

Full lunar eclipse to bring super blood Moon
Full lunar eclipse to bring super blood Moon

The Moon will slowly darken and turn red as it falls into Earth's shadow.

Researchers successfully grew plants in Apollo-era lunar soil. Their work could inform future space farmers.
Researchers successfully grew plants in Apollo-era lunar soil. Their work could inform future space farmers.

Plants grown in moon dirt showed signs of stress, were smaller, and grew more slowly than their counterparts grown in soil from Earth.

Birds are falling from the sky in India as a record heatwave dries up water sources
Birds are falling from the sky in India as a record heatwave dries up water sources

Vets in an animal hospital in Ahmedabad said they had treated thousands of dehydrated birds in recent weeks due to relentless "unsurvivable" heat.

Doctor planning womb transplant to allow a transgender woman to carry children
Doctor planning womb transplant to allow a transgender woman to carry children

A doctor in India is planning a womb transplant that might allow a transgender woman to carry children.

Latinos with chest pain wait in ER about half hour longer than others, study shows
Latinos with chest pain wait in ER about half hour longer than others, study shows

Latinos who reported chest pain in an emergency room waited half an hour longer than other races or ethnicities, a Morehouse School of Medicine study found.

Moon goes blood red this weekend:
Moon goes blood red this weekend: 'Eclipse for the Americas'

A total lunar eclipse will grace the night skies this weekend, providing longer than usual thrills for stargazers across North and South America. It will be...

Climate change doubled risk of deadly South Africa flood, scientists say
Climate change doubled risk of deadly South Africa flood, scientists say

Scientists warned that extreme events like this are likely to happen again "with even greater intensity."

Kraft Heinz is making a ketchup bottle made of wood pulp
Kraft Heinz is making a ketchup bottle made of wood pulp

Heinz announced it is working to develop a new recyclable condiment bottle "made from 100 percent sustainability sourced wood pulp."

Warship sonar could be causing mass dolphin deaths in the Black Sea
Warship sonar could be causing mass dolphin deaths in the Black Sea

ISTANBUL - Mass dolphin deaths have scientists worried that pollution from Russia's war in Ukraine could have lasting impacts on ecosystems in the region.

Moon soil used to grow plants for first time in breakthrough test
Moon soil used to grow plants for first time in breakthrough test

The research is an important step towards making long-terms stays on the moon possible.

Covid-19 narrows long-standing Latino mortality advantage, study finds
Covid-19 narrows long-standing Latino mortality advantage, study finds

Latinos have long experienced lower mortality rates compared to non-Hispanic whites, but the high rate of Hispanic Covid-19 deaths has narrowed the advantage...


Female mice release banana-scented urine when pregnant to deter males

Pregnant and lactating female mice release a banana-smelling chemical in their urine that is thought to stress out males so they don’t commit infanticide

New kind of camera can image mini-tornadoes in quantum liquids

Researchers have built a camera-like device for understanding how vortices form in quantum liquids, where atoms pair up and start to behave like overlapping waves

Covid-19 news: UK set to offer autumn boosters to the most vulnerable

A regular round-up of the latest coronavirus news, plus insight, features and interviews from New Scientist about the covid-19 pandemic

Kyoto's cherry blossoms are blooming earlier because of climate change

The Japanese city is famous for its cherry blossoms, which traditionally mark the start of spring, but rising temperatures are seeing them bloom early

Noisy boats over the Great Barrier Reef are cutting fish lives short

The noise of motorboats over the Great Barrier Reef can stress its inhabitants, stunting the growth of young fish and leaving them less likely to live to adulthood

Climate change means people are losing 44 hours of sleep per year

Analysis of data from sleep-tracking wristbands in 68 countries reveals that unusually hot nights are causing people fall asleep later, rise earlier and sleep less

First monkeypox genome from latest outbreak shows links to 2018 strain

The draft sequence of the virus responsible for the rapidly growing monkeypox outbreak shows it is most closely related to strains detected in the UK, Singapore and Israel in 2018 and 2019

Australian election 2022: What will the outcome mean for the climate?

Australia’s targets for cutting carbon emissions are among the weakest in developed nations, but a new government could accelerate the transition to renewable energy

Boeing's Starliner spacecraft launches to ISS despite thruster issue

At the moment, only SpaceX is able to launch astronauts to the International Space Station from US soil, but Boeing hopes to change that with an uncrewed test of its Starliner spacecraft

Covid-19 rebound seen in some people after taking Pfizer drug Paxlovid

Pfizer’s Paxlovid can prevent severe covid-19 in vulnerable people when taken as a five-day course at home, but the medicine may not eradicate the virus in everyone

Young wasps routinely eat their own siblings in the nest

Isodontia harmandi wasps make nests and leave food for their young in bamboo canes. When that food runs out, the larvae turn to cannibalism

Robot can fly, swim or hitch a ride by sticking to other objects

An amphibious drone that can attach itself to other objects with a suction cup could be used to track marine animals such as whales

Tracking sleep disruptions could improve nerve pain treatments

After sustaining nerve injuries, mice wake up more often during non-REM sleep – a sign that sleep disruption could help identify nerve pain and the best treatments for it

Covid-19 vaccines may ward off long covid even if given post-infection

Researchers compared the rate of long covid among people who were vaccinated after catching covid-19 with those who developed long covid before being vaccinated

Smart contact lens could directly deliver glaucoma drugs when needed

A wireless contact lens that monitors eye pressure and delivers glaucoma drugs on demand has been tested in animals

How did US baby formula get contaminated with dangerous bacteria?

Cronobacter sakazakii contamination shut down the biggest formula manufacturing plant in the US. What we know about how it happened and what parents struggling to find formula can do

Super-sized atoms can be used as a receiver to stream live video

When excited by lasers, a tiny glass container filled with rubidium atoms can act as a receiver for streamed video signals

Ediacarans: Did competition kill off Earth’s mysterious first animals?

A mysterious extinction about 540 million years ago may have been caused when early animals began competing against one another

Pollution killed 9 million people worldwide in 2019 alone

Pollution accounted for one in six deaths three years ago, a figure that is unchanged since the last analysis in 2015

Plan to feed phone data of NHS mental health patients to AI mothballed

An AI was designed to predict when people are at risk of having a mental health crisis, based on their health records, but plans to extend the project with mobile phone data seem to have been scrapped

Two newly described Amazon fish species are on the brink of extinction

New varieties of South American darter fish were documented in Brazil’s Apuí region. But deforestation in the area means they may soon be extinct

Pairs of giant planets may make their star systems ultra-habitable

Simulations of more than 140,000 possible planetary systems show that pairs of giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn may make their star systems more hospitable to habitable Earth-like worlds

Nearly a third of bites by malaria-carrying mosquitoes are in the day

Detailed analysis of mosquito bites in the Central African Republic found that, contrary to assumptions, many occur indoors during the daytime when people are not well protected by traditional anti-malaria defences

Emphysema missed among Black men in US due to race-adjusted lung tests

Poorly supported assumptions about typical levels of lung function among Black men in the US are leading medics to miss cases of emphysema

Which countries will do well at Eurovision 2022 – according to science

Neuroscientists measured 75 volunteers’ physiological responses while they watched eight countries’ performances to predict which songs will do well in the popular vote

Strange state of matter made into a pancake-shape for first time

A supersolid is an exotic state of matter that behaves like both a solid and a fluid. It was first predicted 60 years ago, but has only recently been created in the lab

'Funk fungus' is a funny phrase and scientists now know why

A study looking at more than 55,000 pairs of words has found why word pairings like "gnome bone" and "spam scrotum" seem to be more amusing than their constituent parts

Protein gel could help treat type 1 diabetes

The gel, which was implanted alongside a pancreatic cell transplant in monkeys with type 1 diabetes, releases a protein that kills overactive immune cells, preventing the pancreatic cells from being rejected

Genetically engineered bacteria have learned to play tic-tac-toe

E. coli bacteria modified to act like electronic components called memristors can be set up to act as a simple neural network and trained to play noughts and crosses

Launch of UK 'moonshot' ARIA research agency delayed until end of year

Neither ARIA's chief executive nor its chair have been appointed yet, though announcements are expected imminently

Covid-19 news: US records over 1 million coronavirus deaths

A regular round-up of the latest coronavirus news, plus insight, features and interviews from New Scientist about the covid-19 pandemic

Why some words become funnier when paired together

A study looking at more than 55,000 pairs of words has found why word pairings like "funk fungus" and "gnome bone" seem to be more amusing than their constituent parts

Sweater includes a wireless charger to keep your gadgets topped up

A sweater containing tubes filled with a liquid metal alloy can charge up wearable electronic devices

AI suggests how to make beer with whatever ingredients you have

Brewers could create new recipes that produce beers with desired properties using AI, and it will even work if you are missing some ingredients

A steroid might be why octopuses starve themselves after mating

After mating, female octopuses increase production of a steroid hormone, which may drive them to starve themselves while guarding their eggs

Coral reefs have conveyor belts of mucus running across their surface

Tiny cilia on coral reef polyps coordinate to generate currents that run across the reef surface, perhaps to carry food to all colony members

Growing plants in soil from the moon doesn't really work very well

Thale cress plants have been grown in regolith, the fine dust that covers the moon’s surface, using samples from Apollo missions – but they turn out small and stunted

How dragonflies use ultrafast wing movements to flip over in flight

When dropped upside down, dragonflies rapidly flip 180 degrees by changing the angle of their wings – but only if they can see their surroundings

What's next for Event Horizon Telescope after its black hole pictures?

Now that the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration has released its picture of the Milky Way's black hole, the team is focusing on making movies of the two photographed black holes and finding other distant black holes large enough to study

Computer powered by colony of blue-green algae has run for six months

Blue-green algae, a type of cyanobacteria, set in a container on a windowsill powered a computer continuously for six months using photosynthesis

UK environment watchdog rebukes government for slow action on nature

Cross-government support for the 25-year environment plan lacks the gravitas or urgency of the UK’s net zero goal, says the Office for Environmental Protection

'World-leading' research not confined to elite universities, says REF

The Research Excellence Framework, an assessment of UK universities' research output, has found that "world-leading" research is distributed across the country rather than concentrated in a few elite institutions

What is at risk if Roe v Wade is repealed in the US?

State laws could restrict abortion in large parts of the US, and other reproductive healthcare offerings may be at stake if Roe v Wade is overturned

Some medicines prescribed to treat back pain may prolong the problem

Two drugs called dexamethasone and diclofenac relieve pain in the short term but may block healing of the injury and so cause worse pain long term

Mars was wet more recently than we thought, according to Chinese rover

There may have been liquid water on Mars much more recently than we thought, according to an analysis of rocks by China’s Zhurong rover

Kenyan chameleons evolved brighter colours after moving to Hawaii

Chameleons introduced to Hawaii in 1972 have started flaunting brighter colours, probably because they have fewer predators to hide from

Invisible 3D printed tags turn simple objects into gaming controllers

Adding invisible tags to 3D printed objects could link the objects to information or turn them into controllers for gaming

Amazon deforestation in April was the worst in modern records

The area cleared in April almost doubled, from 579 square kilometres in April last year to 1012 square kilometres, despite a pledge to halt deforestation

Covid-19 news: Fourth vaccine may offer ‘substantial’ antibody boost

A regular round-up of the latest coronavirus news, plus insight, features and interviews from New Scientist about the covid-19 pandemic

Deadly 1918 flu pandemic may be source of modern milder seasonal virus

Viruses sequenced from century-old lung samples in German and Austrian museums have shed light on how flu can change over time

Top News: Science