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WHO to request cholera vaccines for Haiti, expects further spread
WHO to request cholera vaccines for Haiti, expects further spread

GENEVA (Reuters) -A World Health Organization spokesperson said on Tuesday it was setting up tents to treat cholera in Haiti and would also request the supply of oral vaccines against the disease, which has unexpectedly returned to a country paralysed by a gang blockade. The disease killed some 10,000 people through a 2010 outbreak that has been blamed on a United Nations peacekeeping force that was stationed in Haiti. "It's very important now to get assistance on the ground as soon as possible," Christian Lindmeier told a Geneva press briefing, describing a "difficult cocktail" of circumstances around the disease's spread, with cases emerging in gang-controlled areas where access to...

Planned Parenthood to launch first-of-its-kind mobile abortion clinic in Midwest
Planned Parenthood to launch first-of-its-kind mobile abortion clinic in Midwest

Planned Parenthood will launch a mobile clinic in Illinois: A 37-foot-long RV with a waiting room, a standard lab and exam rooms.

As TV doctor, Mehmet Oz provided platform for questionable products and views
As TV doctor, Mehmet Oz provided platform for questionable products and views

Mehmet Oz looked directly into the camera and introduced his daytime television viewers to a "controversial" weight loss approach: taking a hormone that women produce during pregnancy combined with a diet of 500 calories a day. "Does it really work? Is it safe? Is it a miracle? Or is it hype?" he asked in a 2011 episode of "The Dr. Oz Show" before introducing his audience to "human chorionic gonadotropin," or HCG, and to a weight loss doctor who promoted it.Subscribe to The Post Most newsletter

'A terrible cycle': Hurricane Fiona, natural disasters expose mental health crisis in Puerto Rico

Hurricane Fiona hit Puerto Rico on the week of Hurricane Maria's 5-year anniversary, causing many to relive the trauma, anxiety and uncertainty.

No, it
No, it's not just sugary food that's responsible for poor oral health in America's children, especially in Appalachia

Tooth decay can cause pain, embarrassment, missed school and more. Olga Simonova/EyeEm via Getty ImagesBrushing your teeth is essential for maintaining optimal oral health, but like most aspects of health, the full story is more complicated. As directors of the Center for Oral Health Research in Appalachia, we know firsthand that inequalities exist when it comes to oral health, including in children. Some people or groups have considerably more oral health problems than others because of a combi

Bird flu spreads to Southern California, infecting chickens, wild birds and other animals
Bird flu spreads to Southern California, infecting chickens, wild birds and other animals

A highly infectious bird flu that has felled millions of birds globally is in California. Experts worry it could affect our food supply.

New model says Type 1 diabetes cases worldwide could double by 2040
New model says Type 1 diabetes cases worldwide could double by 2040

Using a new model for projecting the number of people with Type 1 diabetes worldwide, members of an international team of researchers estimate up to 17.4 million cases by 2040, double the number of people known to have the disease today. A study published in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology says 8.4 million people now live with Type 1 diabetes, which occurs when the pancreas produces little or no insulin, leading to a buildup in blood sugar that can be disabling or fatal. Symptoms include exc

Which COVID-19 bivalent booster should I get, and when? What you need to know.
Which COVID-19 bivalent booster should I get, and when? What you need to know.

The new bivalent COVID-19 boosters are available across the U.S. Here's where to go and when to get it.

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It's flu vaccine time and seniors need revved-up shots

Doctors have a message for vaccine-weary Americans: Don't skip your flu shot this fall -- and seniors, ask for a special extra-strength kind. After flu hit historically low levels during the COVID-19 pandemic, it may be poised for a comeback. The main clue: A nasty flu season just ended in Australia.

Haiti reports cholera deaths for first time in 3 years
Haiti reports cholera deaths for first time in 3 years

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) - Haiti's government on Sunday announced that at least eight people have died from cholera, raising concerns about a potentially fast-spreading scenario and reviving memories of an epidemic that killed nearly 10,000 people a decade ago. The cases - the first cholera deaths reported in three years - came in a community called Dekayet in southern Port-au-Prince and in the gang-controlled seaside slum of Cite de Soleil, where thousands of people live in cramped, unsanitary conditions. "Cholera is something that can spread very, very quickly," warned Laure Adrien, director general of Haiti's health ministry.

A 31-year-old woman who had her tubes removed says she never has to worry about an
A 31-year-old woman who had her tubes removed says she never has to worry about an 'oopsie' pregnancy in a post-Roe v. Wade America: 'This has given me so much peace'

"According to the lawmakers in this country, I don't have a brain in my head," Sarah G. told Insider.

Cheese sold in the U.S. and Mexico recalled due to listeria outbreak
Cheese sold in the U.S. and Mexico recalled due to listeria outbreak

Brie and Camembert cheeses sold nationwide in the U.S. and in Mexico were recalled after they were linked to a listeria outbreak that led to six cases of the

Mental health crisis programs face challenges in rural areas
Mental health crisis programs face challenges in rural areas

Mental health crisis teams answer emergency calls previously handled by police. Programs in rural areas face challenges.

Robotic health care is coming to a hospital near you
Robotic health care is coming to a hospital near you

Are you ready for this? MONOPOLY919/Shutterstock.comMedical robots are helping doctors and other professionals save time, lower costs and shorten patient recovery times, but patients may not be ready. Our research into human perceptions of automated health care finds that people are wary of getting their health care from an automated system, but that they can adjust to the idea - especially if it saves them money. Hospitals and medical practices are already using a fair amount of automation. For

Suicide is complicated. So is prevention
Suicide is complicated. So is prevention

Suicide is complicated and nuanced, but can be preventable.

School lunch is too costly for a growing number of families. Will a White House pledge help?
School lunch is too costly for a growing number of families. Will a White House pledge help?

The end of universal school meals has left a growing number unable to keep up with school lunch payments, yet unable to qualify for free or reduced-price meals.

'4-alarm blaze': New York's public health crises converge

A look inside the state health department's battle against three simultaneous disease outbreaks

This
This 'magic' mushroom dispensary in Florida is selling psychedelics and testing legal boundaries

Chillum in Tampa, Florida, is selling "magic" mushroom products made from a strain that is not illegal in all but one state.

US military medical teams try new approach in Central America
US military medical teams try new approach in Central America

U.S. military medical teams have carried out medical missions in Central America for decades, but a recently completed mission to Honduras and Guatemala may set a new standard for future health care missions. During what was known as HEART 22, the military's acronym for Health Engagements Assistance Response Team, about 50 military medical personnel worked out of major medical facilities in Honduras and Guatemala, working alongside local doctors and medical staff who will provide enduring medical care to the patients treated during the mission.

When you feel a pop in your knee, you should get it checked out. It could get worse
When you feel a pop in your knee, you should get it checked out. It could get worse

Q. I am a 40-year-old active recreational athlete. I work out at the gym at least three days a week and play soccer on the weekends. About three months ago, I felt a pop in my left knee while playing. The knee swelled but improved after a few days. I still have pain on the inside part of my knee, and sometimes it gets stuck and takes awhile to straighten it out. I am able to play and work out but my knee hurts while doing it. A friend says it is cartilage damage. Should I stop playing and how lo

Florida hospital without running water faces crisis after Hurricane Ian
Florida hospital without running water faces crisis after Hurricane Ian

Workers and patients said the facility's running water went out after Hurricane Ian hit. High-risk patients are being evacuated by ambulance and helicopter.

Nick Cannon announces birth of 10th child, just weeks after welcoming his 9th
Nick Cannon announces birth of 10th child, just weeks after welcoming his 9th

Nick Cannon and Brittany Bell named their baby Rise Messiah Cannon.

Fact check: False claim that Joe Biden blamed singer Elton John for AIDS
Fact check: False claim that Joe Biden blamed singer Elton John for AIDS

President Joe Biden's remarks at an event honoring British singer Elton John are being misinterpreted by social media users online.

Adam Scott says LIV Golf not
Adam Scott says LIV Golf not 'pure evil' for the game

Adam Scott says Greg Norman's association with LIV Golf hasn't strained his relationship with his long-time mentor and adds he doesn't see the new tour as...

Some officials now say monkeypox elimination unlikely in US
Some officials now say monkeypox elimination unlikely in US

Some U.S. health officials are conceding that monkeypox is probably not going away anytime soon. The disease's spread is slowing but the virus is so widespread that elimination is unlikely, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Lipsitch hesitated to say monkeypox is permanently here to stay, but he said it stands to be a continuing threat for the next few years.

What to know about the new ALS drug
What to know about the new ALS drug

Patients and advocates are celebrating the approval of a new treatment designed to slow the progression of ALS, a devastating neurogenerative disease that kills most people within five years. The drug, Relyvrio, is only the third ALS treatment cleared by the Food and Drug Administration in almost three decades and the first since 2017. Brian Wallach, a former Obama administration official who founded the nonprofit group I Am ALS after being diagnosed with the disease, tweeted that the approval h

At least 5 sailors sickened after jet fuel leaks into USS Nimitz
At least 5 sailors sickened after jet fuel leaks into USS Nimitz' drinking water, Navy says

At least five sailors aboard the USS Nimitz were sickened after military jet fuel contaminated the aircraft carrier's water supply, the Navy said Friday.

'Chicago Med' star Marlyne Barrett reveals she has uterine and ovarian cancer

"Chicago Med" star Marlyne Barrett has been diagnosed with uterine and ovarian cancer. Her her diagnosis came after doctors discovered a football-sized tumor on her uterus and left ovary in July.

King Charles is watching how Queen Margrethe
King Charles is watching how Queen Margrethe's decision to strip her grandchildren of their titles plays out, an expert on European royalty says

The announcement from Denmark's queen has caused a rift in her royal family. Charles is likely taking note as considers restructuring the monarchy.

Surviving gun violence does not end victims
Surviving gun violence does not end victims' pain and trauma

Hospital programs like Healing Hurt People in Philadelphia and Chicago's Shirley Ryan AbilityLab are dedicated to providing psychological aftercare to victims of gun violence.

'I felt like I failed': inflation puts healthy food out of reach for millions of Americans

Public health experts worry rising grocery costs could increase the risk for diet-related diseases in the long run

One big change is coming to clinical drug trials. And it
One big change is coming to clinical drug trials. And it's 'no longer lip service.'

In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic, one major change is coming to clinical drug trials: More diversity.

Hurricane Ian flooded a hospital and forced evacuations from dozens of nursing homes - many health facilities face similar risks from severe storms
Hurricane Ian flooded a hospital and forced evacuations from dozens of nursing homes - many health facilities face similar risks from severe storms

Nursing homes patients had to be evacuated after Hurricane Ian cut access to safe water supplies. AP Photo/John RaouxHurricane Ian, one of the most powerful storms to hit the U.S., tore part of the roof off a hospital in Port Charlotte, Florida, and flooded the building's lower level emergency room, sending staff scrambling to move patients as water poured in. At least nine hospitals and dozens of nursing homes had to transfer patients after losing access to clean water because of the storm. Hea

Virus kills 100,000 cattle in India, threatens livelihoods
Virus kills 100,000 cattle in India, threatens livelihoods

A viral disease has killed nearly 100,000 cows and buffaloes in India and sickened over 2 million more. The outbreak has triggered devastating income losses for cattle farmers since the disease not only results in deaths but can also lead to decreased milk production, emaciated animals, and birth issues. The disease, called lumpy skin disease, is spread by insects that drink blood like mosquitoes and ticks.

Here
Here's what it actually means to die 'of old age'

Aging is not actually a cause of death. But older people are more likely to succumb to common infections like pneumonia.

Drink 2 or 3 cups of coffee a day? You might live longer - especially if it
Drink 2 or 3 cups of coffee a day? You might live longer - especially if it's ground, study says

Drinking two to three cups of coffee each day might help you live longer and reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, a new study suggests.

What if doctors could write prescriptions for adequate housing? More than anything else, it might improve a person
What if doctors could write prescriptions for adequate housing? More than anything else, it might improve a person's overall health.

Providing housing to people who are chronically homeless, and women who are pregnant or who have a newborn child, is particularly important.

China Walvax
China Walvax's mRNA COVID vaccine obtains first approval overseas

JAKARTA/BEIJING (Reuters) -The Indonesian food and drugs agency (BPOM) said on Thursday it has approved the emergency use of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine developed by China's Walvax Biotechnology. It is the first authorisation for a China-developed COVID shot based on the novel mRNA technology, which Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna also use in their COVID vaccines, after more than two years of development. The AWcorna shot, which is designed based on the original strain of the coronavirus, has yet to generate efficacy readings from large trials to show how well it can reduce the risk of COVID cases and deaths from the disease.

How to clean dogs
How to clean dogs' ears: Your guide to hygiene and administering medicine

To clean your dog's ears, start by holding your dog's ear flap, and squirting a few drops of ear cleanser near the ear opening.

Biohaven
Biohaven's ALS drug fails to meet study goals

The migraine drugmaker in May agreed to an $11.6 billion acquisition deal by Pfizer Inc, which plans to spin off its non-migraine drugs into a new publicly traded company. On Thursday, Biohaven said its drug for ALS did not achieve statistically significant improvement in patients' performance of daily activities compared to a placebo in a mid-to-late-stage trial. ALS is a progressive and life-threatening neuromuscular disease, and the average age for survival is 3-5 years after the onset of first symptoms.

Hurricane Ian flooded a hospital
Hurricane Ian flooded a hospital's lower floor and tore its ICU's roof off, forcing staff to evacuate its sickest patients

Hurricane Ian meant that some of the patients who were on ventilators had to be evacuated at HCA Florida Fawcett Hospital in Port Charlotte.

Hurricane Ian strikes Florida hospital from above and below
Hurricane Ian strikes Florida hospital from above and below

Hurricane Ian swamped a Florida hospital from both above and below, the storm surge flooding its lower level emergency room while fierce winds tore part of its fourth floor roof from its intensive care unit, according to a doctor who works there. Dr. Birgit Bodine spent the night at HCA Florida Fawcett Hospital in Port Charlotte, anticipating the storm would make things busy, "but we didn't anticipate that the roof would blow off on the fourth floor," she said.

Taiwan to end COVID quarantine for arrivals, welcome back tourists
Taiwan to end COVID quarantine for arrivals, welcome back tourists

TAIPEI (Reuters) -Taiwan will end its mandatory COVID-19 quarantine for arrivals from Oct. 13 and welcome tourists back, the government said on Thursday, completing a major step on its plan to re-open to the outside world. Taiwan had kept some of its entry and quarantine rules in place as large parts of the rest of Asia relaxed or lifted them completely, although in June it cut the number of days required in isolation for arrivals to three from seven previously. Taiwan has reported 6.3 million domestic cases since the beginning of the year, driven by the more infectious Omicron variant.

Monkeypox vaccine appears to be working, but CDC still urges precautions
Monkeypox vaccine appears to be working, but CDC still urges precautions

Early data, based on people who were eligible for the shots, found the unvaccinated are 14 times more likely to catch monkeypox.

What It Costs to Get an Abortion Now
What It Costs to Get an Abortion Now

L.V. found out she was pregnant Aug. 7. The next day, she called Women's Health and Family Care in Jackson, Wyoming - the only abortion provider in the state - to schedule an abortion. She was told the procedure would typically cost $600 at the clinic, but a state law banning abortion might take effect soon. In that case, she would have to travel out of state, setting her back even more. L.V., who asked to be identified only by her initials, panicked. She had recently been in a car accident and

China
China's COVID worries to take shine off Golden Week holiday

Travel during China's Golden Week holiday, which begins on Saturday, is set to hit its lowest in years, analysts say, as COVID-19 concerns spur calls for people to avoid travel and keep to their cities, while economic woes damp spending. One of the longest stretches of public holidays, which celebrates the founding of modern China in 1949, the period is a bellwether for consumer demand in the world's second largest economy, when travel and spending traditionally peak. While global travel has started to open up as many countries opt to live with COVID-19, China's tourism sector has crumpled under authorities' decision to double down on their zero-COVID approach with drastic curbs, such...

Katie Couric reveals she was diagnosed with breast cancer
Katie Couric reveals she was diagnosed with breast cancer

Katie Couric, a former co-anchor of NBC's "TODAY" show, announced Wednesday that she has been undergoing treatment for breast cancer.

Katie Couric announces her breast cancer diagnosis
Katie Couric announces her breast cancer diagnosis

The former "CBS Evening News" and "Today" anchor finished her final round of radiation treatments this week.

White House gains partners to end US hunger within a decade
White House gains partners to end US hunger within a decade

The Biden administration is counting on a variety of private-sector partnerships to help fund and implement its ambitious goal of ending hunger in America by 2030. President Joe Biden is hosting a conference Wednesday on hunger, nutrition and health, the first by the White House since 1969. The conference hosted by Nixon, a Republican, led to a major expansion of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, commonly known as food stamps, and gave rise to the Women, Infants and Children program, which serves half the babies born in the U.S. by providing their mothers with parenting advice, breastfeeding support and food assistance.

Shionogi says COVID pill trial shows reduction in symptoms
Shionogi says COVID pill trial shows reduction in symptoms

TOKYO (Reuters) -Japan's Shionogi & Co Ltd said on Wednesday its oral treatment for COVID-19 demonstrated a significant reduction in symptoms compared with a placebo in a Phase III trial in Asia. The drug, a protease inhibitor known as ensitrelvir, met its primary endpoint in a trial conducted among predominantly vaccinated patients with mild to moderate cases of COVID-19, the company said in a statement. Shionogi's shares reversed an early decline after the announcement, closing 1.1% higher in Tokyo versus a 1.5 drop in the benchmark Nikkei gauge.


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