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UK weather: People urged to heat main rooms as cold snap begins
UK weather: People urged to heat main rooms as cold snap begins

Health officials advise warming living rooms in the day and bedrooms at night during the cold spell.

Telescopes Team Up to Forecast an Alien Storm on Titan
Telescopes Team Up to Forecast an Alien Storm on Titan

It was a cloudy day on Titan. That was clear on the morning of Nov. 5 when Sébastien Rodriguez, an astronomer at the Université Paris Cité, downloaded the...

Medieval necklace found near Northampton
Medieval necklace found near Northampton 'internationally important'

Experts uncover a "once-in-a-lifetime" discovery near Northampton of international significance.

Ethereum change cut cryptocurrency power demand
Ethereum change cut cryptocurrency power demand

Switching systems may have made electricity savings similar to the amount used by Ireland.

California airports face disruption due to flooding, study finds
California airports face disruption due to flooding, study finds

Los Angeles and San Francisco international airports are among dozens in California that could see disruptions in as little as 20 to 40 years, researchers...

Wales weather: Met Office issues warning for ice
Wales weather: Met Office issues warning for ice

The Met Office issues weather has issued a yellow weather warning for ice for most of Thursday.

Aluminum plants in the U.S. are releasing tons of a highly potent greenhouse gas, unlike their counterparts abroad
Aluminum plants in the U.S. are releasing tons of a highly potent greenhouse gas, unlike their counterparts abroad

A Century Aluminum plant in Kentucky vented tons of perfluorocarbons, or PFCs, which are among the most potent and longest-lasting greenhouse gases on the...

Plea after three guinea pigs found in bag in Shetland
Plea after three guinea pigs found in bag in Shetland

The Scottish SPCA says it is the wrong way to give up pets if someone can no longer care for them.

A woman who mistakenly visited an anti-abortion crisis pregnancy center said she was met with pushback for seeking an abortion:
A woman who mistakenly visited an anti-abortion crisis pregnancy center said she was met with pushback for seeking an abortion: 'I just was not ready, and words can't make you ready for that'

Crisis pregnancy centers use online ads that appear in searches such as "abortion pill" or "abortion information" in order to appear like clinics.

Nasa
Nasa's Orion spacecraft is homeward-bound

The ship fires its main engine near the Moon, committing itself to a return to Earth on Sunday.

A headache pill inspired my dissolving poo bags
A headache pill inspired my dissolving poo bags

George Greer came up with the idea after being shocked at the amount of plastic waste on the banks of a loch.

Construction begins on the world
Construction begins on the world's largest radio telescope

Construction has begun on the world's largest radio astronomy observatory, known as the Square Kilometre Array.

Myocarditis after Covid vaccine low among teens and young adults, large study finds
Myocarditis after Covid vaccine low among teens and young adults, large study finds

A recent Nationwide Children's Hospital study found myocarditis after Covid vaccination is low in teens and young adults.

Artemis moonship heads back to Earth on last leg of test flight
Artemis moonship heads back to Earth on last leg of test flight

A final major engine firing went off without a hitch to put the Orion capsule on course for Sunday re-entry and splashdown.

With Mauna Loa
With Mauna Loa's Eruption, a Rare Glimpse Into Earth

Notice that Mauna Loa, the largest active volcano in the world, was going to erupt - as it did this past week for the first time in nearly four decades...

Climate change protesters facing jail over Barclays damage
Climate change protesters facing jail over Barclays damage

The seven women smashed glass windows at the Canary Wharf building but denied criminal damage.

Pollution investigated after River Yealm turns white
Pollution investigated after River Yealm turns white

The Environment Agency says it is looking into what has caused the River Yealm to change colour.

Halifax: Pet rhea dies after
Halifax: Pet rhea dies after 'horrific' dog attack

Lucy Keegan says dogs pinned her pet rhea to the floor in a 10-minute attack near Halifax.

Here
Here's what the color of your snot really means

Boogers can tell you quite a lot about the state of your health. Here's what the color of your snot says about you, in one simple table.

Southampton scientist
Southampton scientist's CO2 work earns Earthshot prize

Prof Juerg Matter of Southampton University says the award was recognition of 15 years of research.

Jersey gorilla sculpture made with recycled CDs
Jersey gorilla sculpture made with recycled CDs

A local carpenter has created a gorilla sculpture out of around 7,000 recycled CDs.

Golden eagle project swoops for national honour
Golden eagle project swoops for national honour

The scheme in southern Scotland has seen bird numbers rise from just a handful to nearly 40.

Protecting areas for nature is stalling, says report
Protecting areas for nature is stalling, says report

Nearly a fifth of all land in Scotland is safeguarded, but the amount "in good health" has fallen.

Ponies aid Cotswold nature reserve conservation work
Ponies aid Cotswold nature reserve conservation work

Groups of welsh ponies are grazing on the Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust's reserve at Daneway Banks.

Coastal erosion expected to reveal more skeletons
Coastal erosion expected to reveal more skeletons

Remains of shipwrecked sailors could increase as coastal sites are exposed, say experts.

Bristol surfing lake The Wave to become carbon neutral
Bristol surfing lake The Wave to become carbon neutral

A solar installation is set to make artificial surfing lake The Wave carbon neutral.

Suffolk RSPB says cables plan will
Suffolk RSPB says cables plan will 'damage' nature reserves

The National Grid is proposing cables pass under two RSPB nature reserves on the Suffolk coast.

Tasmanian tiger: Remains of last thylacine found in cupboard after 85 years
Tasmanian tiger: Remains of last thylacine found in cupboard after 85 years

The pelt and skull of the last known thylacine are identified in Hobart, solving an 85-year mystery.

2,500 endangered Caspian seals mysteriously washed up dead on a Russian coast
2,500 endangered Caspian seals mysteriously washed up dead on a Russian coast

Officials in Russia said a cause of death for the Caspian seals has not been established, but drowning by fishing nets has been ruled out.

Indonesia
Indonesia's Mt. Semeru eruption buries homes, damages bridge

Improved weather conditions Monday allowed rescuers to resume evacuation efforts and a search for possible victims after the highest volcano on Indonesia's...

Chinese astronauts return to Earth after six-month mission
Chinese astronauts return to Earth after six-month mission

The astronauts carried out a successful mission to build the Tiangong space station, China says.

7 times NASA
7 times NASA's James Webb Space Telescope spotted something Hubble missed

With its infrared gaze, the James Webb Space Telescope can capture galaxies, planets, moons, and auroras that Hubble can't detect.

Indonesia
Indonesia's Mt. Semeru unleashes lava river in new eruption

Indonesia's highest volcano on its most densely populated island released searing gas clouds and rivers of lava in its latest eruption Sunday. Monsoon rains...

Royal Navy digs out world
Royal Navy digs out world's most remote post office from Antarctic snow

Sailors spend two days at remote UK science station and unearth buildings buried in heavy snow.

Five ways to spend and waste less this Christmas
Five ways to spend and waste less this Christmas

Experts give tips on how to make your Christmas cheaper, greener and just as joyful.

Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter faces quadrupling energy bills
Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter faces quadrupling energy bills

The Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter says it expects its annual £50,000 bill to rise to over £200,000.

7 photos that show the climate crisis is not a distant threat - it
7 photos that show the climate crisis is not a distant threat - it's already here

Images of raging wildfires, damaging storms, flashing floods, and extreme drought showcase a planet that's been transformed by climate change.

Plan to cull grey squirrels in north Devon coastal woodland
Plan to cull grey squirrels in north Devon coastal woodland

Environmental group gets government funding to help control grey squirrels in parts of Devon.

Bristol student plogger aims to clean 30 cities in 30 days
Bristol student plogger aims to clean 30 cities in 30 days

Vivek Gurav and his volunteers have picked up 5,000kg of rubbish while litter-picking in Bristol.

Bright-eyed tree frog wins ecology photo prize
Bright-eyed tree frog wins ecology photo prize

This year's winners of the British Ecological Society competition "celebrate the diversity" of ecology.

20 years ago, a Lyme-disease vaccine was taken off the market. Now, 2 companies are developing one that could be available by 2025.
20 years ago, a Lyme-disease vaccine was taken off the market. Now, 2 companies are developing one that could be available by 2025.

Pfizer and Valneva have said their vaccine produced immunity in phase 2 trials. If phase 3 pans out, they may have the first Lyme vaccine in 20 years.

Bristol: Fossil shows lizards millions of years older than thought
Bristol: Fossil shows lizards millions of years older than thought

A scientist says the fossil is "one of the most important found in the last few decades".

French president visits Louisiana to boost cultural ties
French president visits Louisiana to boost cultural ties

French President Emmanuel Macron arrived Friday in Louisiana, the American state most closely aligned historically with his country, to celebrate their...

Pictures show creepy deep-sea animals, some never before seen, discovered near islands off the coast of Australia
Pictures show creepy deep-sea animals, some never before seen, discovered near islands off the coast of Australia

The ocean floor around the Cocos (Keeling) Islands is teeming was bizarre lifeforms, from the bony-eared assfish to the tribute spiderfish.

Bird flu outbreak confirmed near Dorchester
Bird flu outbreak confirmed near Dorchester

A protection zone of 3km (1.8 miles) is in place south-east of Dorchester.

Toyota in £11.3m government deal to develop hydrogen pickup trucks
Toyota in £11.3m government deal to develop hydrogen pickup trucks

Government funding will help set up a pilot production line to develop clean energy vehicles.

Cheltenham council considering new district heat networks
Cheltenham council considering new district heat networks

Cheltenham Borough Council wants to see whether two separate networks in the town would be viable.

Americans are eating more whole grains, but confused by the labels, new study finds
Americans are eating more whole grains, but confused by the labels, new study finds

Are whole grains good for you? Whole grains are healthy but there is consumer confusion over whole grain labels on breads or cereals, a new study suggests.

Musk
Musk's company aims to soon test brain implant in people

Tech billionaire Elon Musk said his Neuralink company is seeking permission to test its brain implant in people soon. In a "show and tell" presentation...

Scotland
Scotland's bloodsucking pests have mixed fortunes

The weather in parts of Scotland has hit midge numbers but benefited ticks, according to experts.


Homo naledi may have used fire to cook and navigate 230,000 years ago

Archaeologists say they have found evidence that Homo naledi, an extinct human species with a tiny brain, used fire to cook and light up dark tunnels - though this claim remains controversial

Europe’s fastest supercomputer is now connected to a quantum computer

A small quantum computer has been connected to Europe’s fastest supercomputer. This connection could help researchers work out how to best pair quantum computers together with powerful supercomputers to solve complex problems faster

What we know so far about strep A child deaths in the UK

Eight children have died as a result of severe illness caused by the group A streptococcus bacterium

AI listens to toilet sounds to guess whether people have diarrhoea

An artificial intelligence that can detect diarrhoea with 98 per cent accuracy from recordings of toilet sounds could help track outbreaks of diseases, such as cholera

A surprising number of African animals eat beeswax

Honeyguide birds lead humans to bees’ nests and get beeswax as a reward, but camera traps reveal that honey badgers, baboons and mongooses all feed on the leftovers

Heat pump uses a loudspeaker and wet strips of paper to cool air

A prototype heat pump that uses water and sound to cool is three times as efficient as previous comparable designs

Venice may get a temporary respite from rising seas by 2035

High winter sea levels in Venice are linked to warmer sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic Ocean, and cooling in that ocean over coming decades should therefore temporarily compensate for the city's sea level rise

COP15 target to reverse biodiversity loss by 2030 is ‘unrealistic’

Goal to “halt and reverse” biodiversity loss by 2030 – a headline aim of the COP15 biodiversity summit – could take 80 rather than eight years to achieve, say conservationists

Amazing image of crescent Earth rising over the moon captured by Orion

The Orion capsule has made its closest pass above the surface of the moon and begun its journey back to Earth, capturing astonishing views of our planet on the way

Adélie penguins show signs of self-awareness on the mirror test

When shown their reflection, wild Adélie penguins can tell it isn't another penguin – but they may not fully connect their mirror image to themselves

Hundreds of razorbills have been turning up far from home in Italy

Marine seabirds known as razorbills are usually found in cold northern waters, but hundreds of them have been turning up, underfed, in Italy, and no one knows why

Mars may have a huge plume of hot rocks rising towards its surface

Mars has been viewed as a mostly geologically static world, but the planet may have an enormous underground plume of hot rocks slowly rising towards the surface

Trapping powder quickly removes all microplastics from water

A cheap powder can help treat wastewater by rapidly absorbing microscopic bits of plastic pollution – and because it is also magnetic, both can then be removed with magnets

Plasma sail spacecraft could soar like an albatross to Alpha Centauri

A spacecraft equipped with a "sail" made from plasma could build up speed by repeatedly crossing the boundary at the edge of the solar system, just as an albatross soars by taking advantage of regions of different wind speeds

The 3013 neurons in the brain of a fly larva have been mapped in full

A complete map of the neurons inside the brain of a fruit fly larva is the largest example of a whole-brain "connectome", and is a stepping stone to describing the brains of more complex animals, including mice and humans

Most people who threatened to quit Twitter for Mastodon haven't left

Of more than 140,000 Twitter users who announced they were moving to Mastodon, just 1.6 per cent have actually quit Elon Musk’s social media platform

Mexico’s latest plan to save endangered vaquitas could backfire

Hundreds of cement pillars with hooks have been deployed in the Gulf of California to snag fishing nets that threaten endangered porpoises, but these could also trap sea life and pollute the waters

Flying squirrels carve nuts to store them securely in tree branches

Buried nuts would quickly rot in the tropical rainforests of Hainan Island, so flying squirrels have taught themselves carpentry instead

Ancient megatsunami on Mars traced to the crater where it began

Before Mars dried up, an asteroid slammed into one of its oceans and caused a colossal megatsunami, and now researchers have found the crater where it hit

Newly discovered dinosaur has a streamlined body like a diving bird

An analysis of a fossil has revealed a new species of dinosaur named Natovenator polydontus. It was semi-aqautic, looked a bit like a duck and ate meat

Owl-like engravings from Copper Age may have been made by children

Slate plaques from about 5000 years ago engraved with images of what look like owls may have been children’s artwork rather than funeral offerings, but not everyone is convinced

Yellowstone supervolcano contains twice as much melted rock as thought

There is more melted rock under Yellowstone Caldera – a volcano in Wyoming – than was previously estimated, but that doesn’t change the likelihood of an eruption

DeepMind AI uses deception to beat human players in war game Stratego

An AI has learned to deceive human opponents in the war-themed board game Stratego, which involves imperfect information and a huge number of possible game scenarios

Vaccine prompts HIV antibodies in 97 per cent of people in small study

An experimental HIV vaccine led to antibodies against the virus in 35 out of 36 volunteers, but whether this offers protection against the infection is unclear

JWST has taken pictures of clouds on Saturn’s moon Titan

The James Webb Space Telescope and the Keck Observatory in Hawaii have watched clouds changing shape in the sky of Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, which could help us understand its weird atmosphere

First faecal transplant treatment approved for use in the US

A faecal-transplant therapy called Rebyota has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. A single dose can prevent a type of recurrent infection in the gut

Growing off-world diversity is making space for everyone

With more groups and organisations exploring space than ever before, we will all benefit from a diverse range of people and views in low Earth orbit and beyond

An mRNA vaccine protects mice against deadly plague bacteria

The bacterium Yersinia pestis causes frequent outbreaks that kill people, but a new vaccine based on cutting edge technology has shown promise in a mouse study

Alzheimer's drug lecanemab slows cognitive decline but concerns linger

The drug lecanemab slowed the rate of cognitive decline among people with early Alzheimer's disease by 27 per cent, compared with placebo infusions, but some question if its potential safety concerns outweigh any benefits

Star ripped up by black hole is one of the brightest things ever seen

A star orbiting a supermassive black hole at the centre of a distant galaxy was ripped apart in a tidal disruption event, the furthest ever observed

Ancient bird with a movable beak rewrites the story of avian evolution

The earliest birds were thought to have a fused upper beak like ostriches, but a skull bone from 67 million years ago reveals that jointed beaks came first

A quantum computer has simulated a wormhole for the first time

Researchers have used Google's Sycamore quantum computer to simulate a simplified wormhole for the first time, and sent a piece of quantum information through it

Ant pupae produce a nourishing liquid food for larvae and adults

Researchers have observed several species of ants that produce a liquid while in a pupal stage that then gets consumed by their larvae and adults, with the team expecting this to occur across all ant species

COP15: What to expect at the biggest biodiversity summit in a decade

After a two-year delay, the COP15 summit will convene in Montreal to hammer out an agreement to address the biodiversity crisis

Plastic 'Pac-Man' moves using water ripples

A simple device made of plastic and rubber can be controlled using ripples in water to move around obstacles

Microfibres that pollute the seas are floating homes for bacteria

Almost 200 species of bacteria, including one that can cause food poisoning, were found on microfibre particles from the Mediterranean Sea

Sperm-blocking vaginal gel could be a reliable contraceptive method

A gel that has prevented almost all of 1 billion sperm getting past the cervix in sheep could become an alternative to hormonal birth control methods but without the side effects

Do we have 'immunity debt' and how could it affect our infection risk?

The covid-19 lockdowns undoubtedly saved many lives, but the prolonged restrictions also reduced our exposure and immunity to other infections, which could be set to spike in the UK this winter

Boarding school rules on phones and bedtimes help teens get more sleep

At one high school, students who boarded had a consistent lights-out time and no phone access in bed, with these students getting almost five hours of extra sleep a week compared with the students who only attended school during the day

Gliding sensors inspired by floating seeds will biodegrade after use

A biodegradable glider based on the seeds of the Javan cucumber, which float for long distances, could be used to monitor the environment without leaving polluting e-waste

Brain mapping in mice may explain why pain makes us lose our appetite

Researchers have identified different pathways that lower a mouse's desire to eat when it's in pain - and a similar brain circuit could also occur in humans

Japanese firm ispace is racing to put first private lander on the moon

The Japanese Hakuto-R lander is vying to be the first privately-funded spacecraft to land on the moon

Hawaii’s Mauna Loa volcano is erupting for the first time since 1984

For the first time in nearly 40 years, the world’s largest active volcano is erupting in Hawaii, after weeks of increased activity at the caldera

A rat without a Y chromosome could be a glimpse of our genetic future

Researchers have figured out how the Amami spiny rat lost its Y chromosome, and some believe the same fate may be in store for humans

Ancient predator was one of first vertebrates to grow fast while young

The bones of 2-metre-long tetrapod Whatcheeria reveal that it had an early growth spurt – a trait that was thought to have evolved later

Mussel numbers in the river Thames have dropped by up to 99 per cent

Populations of native mussels in the river Thames have dropped massively between 1964 and 2020, possibly because of the effects of pollution and invasive species

Genetically modified tobacco plant produces cocaine in its leaves

Researchers have reproduced the entire biochemical pathway for how coca plants make cocaine in another plant, which could help people manufacture the drug for scientific study

Drones on strings could puppeteer people in virtual reality

Having drones on strings attached to a person could provide a more realistic simulation of interacting with physical objects in virtual reality

Bluewalker 3 satellite is brighter than 99.8 per cent of visible stars

Observations of a huge test satellite that launched in September have fuelled concerns about the impact a planned fleet could have on astronomy

Ukraine's nuclear plants face uncertain future after Russian attacks

Attacks on Ukraine's power grid took all 15 of the nation's power plants offline for the first time ever. Russia also retains control of Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant, the largest nuclear station in Europe

Top News: Science